A Feminist Cry = sensible dress = Bloomers (lingerie)

“And now I’m dressed like a little girl, in a dress both loose and short,
Oh with what freedom I can sing, and walk all ‘round about!
And when I get a little strength, some work I think I can do,
‘Twill give me health and comfort, and make me useful too.”
— The Sibyl magazine, April 15, 1859

Originally, Bloomers, also called the bloomer, the Turkish dress, the American dress, or simply reform dress, are divided women’s garments for the lower body. They were developed in the 19th century as a healthful and comfortable alternative to the heavy, constricting dresses worn by women.

Amelia Jenks Bloomer (May 27, 1818 – December 30, 1894) was an American women’s rights and temperance advocate. Even though she did not create the women’s clothing reform style known as bloomers, her name became associated with it because of her early and strong advocacy.

Bloomers, as lingerie, are baggy underwear that extends to just below or above the knee and fastened. (Can be known as “knickers” or “directoire knickers”).  Bloomers were worn for several decades during the first part of the 20th century, but are not widely worn today.

Often the term “bloomers” has been used interchangeably with the pantalettes worn by women and girls in the mid 19th century and the open leg knee-length drawers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Something for CosPlay or DD/bg?

PS: Also a nickname for cheerleading briefs. 😀

 


4 Comments on “A Feminist Cry = sensible dress = Bloomers (lingerie)”

  1. I much prefer the bloomers we find today in Victoria’s Secret.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. […] website calls them “Bloomers” – maybe they are the mini-version. Sexy in an innocent manner. By Loup Charmant […]

    Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.