Understanding Hospice

dievca’s Dad will receive Hospice Care – a UTI, a round with Pneumonia and having trouble getting all the nutrients put him into the suggested category. But the true determinate is Dad’s not trying. dievca gets it – he’s tired.

The only problem is that dievca had a two-week timeframe in her mind for death. Her past experiences with “Hospice” were a quick end. Her good friend didn’t make it home the day she was to leave the hospital for Hospice and her Aunt died the 1st night back at home.

she was incorrect.

Hospice Care is a shifting of focus:

Healing and getting someone up and running.
vs.
Helping someone be comfortable if they cannot handle (or don’t want to handle) the push to recover from all ailments.

To qualify for Hospice assistance, the person needs to be seen as passing within 6 months. There are target criteria for various health issues.

That doesn’t mean that they cannot have care beyond 6 months and that doesn’t mean that if they feel better they cannot move into a recovery mode. It just means that they take care of issues with Nurses at home, rather than staying in a hospital or rehab program. No one insisting on Speech therapy, an MRI or a prescription of statins, etc.

dievca’s Dad is tired of hospitals and has gone through 6 recoveries. He’s not feeling the juice of Life, right now. Again, got it.

Dad has been living with a non-reparable hole in his heart for years. Amazing.

Look, she knows he may go tomorrow, but she’s seen him bounce back.
To be honest, she’s getting a bit tired, too. Dad and Mom’s health is a rollercoaster ride.

What Is Palliative Care?

This program aims to ease pain and help with other problems if your illness is serious but not considered to be life-threatening for now.

It helps people live with the symptoms of long-running things such as cancer, kidney disease or AIDS, or with the side effects of the treatments.

Palliative medicine doesn’t replace other treatments. It’s an addition that helps you and your family deal with things such as nausea, nerve pain, or shortness of breath.

What Is Hospice Care?

Sometimes called, “Comfort Care”. This is for people who have learned from doctors that they are not expected to recover from their condition. It’s about easing pain and helping families prepare for the end of life. Palliative care is part of that, but it’s just one part.

People in hospice care generally are expected to have less than 6 months to live. They’re often at home, where family members and professional caregivers look after them. But you could also choose a specialized center for hospice care. It’s also offered at many nursing homes and hospitals.

Every Medicare-certified hospice provider must provide these four levels of care:
  • Level 1: Routine Home Care.
      • Nursing services
      • Physician participation
      • Social services
      • Home health aide services
      • Counseling services (pastoral, spiritual, bereavement, dietary, and others)
      • Medications
      • Medical equipment
      • Medical supplies
      • Lab and diagnostic studies related to a terminal diagnosis
      • Therapy services
  • Level 2: Continuous Home Care.
      • Some examples of symptoms requiring continuous care would be:
        • Unrelieved pain
        • Severe nausea and vomiting
        • Severe shortness of breath
        • Anxiety or panic attacks
        • A breakdown in the primary caregiver support system
  • Level 3: General Inpatient Care.
      • A free-standing facility owned and operated by a hospice company
      • An inpatient hospice unit within a hospital
      • A hospice unit in a skilled nursing facility (nursing home)
  • Level 4: Respite Care.
      • Respite care services are more for the family than for the patient. If the patient does not meet the criteria to qualify them for continuous care or inpatient care, but the family is having a difficult time
      • If a patient’s family is the primary source of care and cannot meet their loved one’s needs due to caregiver stress or other extenuating circumstances, a patient may temporarily be admitted to an inpatient environment to give the family a needed break or respite.
      • There is a five-day limit on respite care. Once that period expires, the patient is discharged and returns home.

dievca’s Parents have assistance at home. That hasn’t changed.  dievca’s Dad will have a Nurse visit three times a week in addition to the caregiver’s help and will be keeping the urinary catheter from the UTI unless he starts to stand up effectively or the Nurse says it needs to be taken out. That is a battle that dievca is glad she is not involved with~

OK, she needs to make a “Mix Tape” for her Parents.  They haven’t had enough music in their life lately. Thanks for letting her hash it out.

XO

A "Thank you" to WebMD and VeryWellHeath.

3 Comments on “Understanding Hospice”

  1. Cinn says:

    Sending all the sparkles your way my friend. You and your parents are in my thoughts and prayers ❤️

    Like

  2. Big hug and a ton of admiration for your strength ❤️

    Like

  3. I wish you and your family the best in this trying time.

    Like


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