Sharing something useful…

#2 Tossware

Yikes!  Rooftops in NYC are really windy and it’s not safe to have crystal wineglasses get knocked over or break on the concrete.

Tossware is a brand of reusable, recyclable crystal clear plastic-ware which is elegant for parties where traditional crystal is not a smart idea.

dievca found it very elegant to use, it washes well and stacks/stores easily for the cupboard or storage unit.

Excellent for a NYC apartment building and just as good for the Suburbia Football Saturdays grilling out on the patio.

dievca bought her Tossware on Amazon.

Take a look:

You can even go on to the Tossware site and get pieces made for your event or use their fun graphics:

 

 


Useful items in the City…

…or Elsewhere.

#1 Baggu Nylon Shopping Tote

dievca is on a kick to streamline her closets and hidden spaces. It’s not Maria Kondo: KonMari Method, but it is the “try everything on” (clothing) – “wear everything once to make sure before discarding” (handbags, accessories, shoes) and decide if it is going to useful in 5 years.

dievca has been known to keep something unused for 5+ years and then use it till its falling apart the next 5 years.  “I know why you bought that” is a common statement via dievca’s Mother, dievca’s friends and Master when sorting her stuff.

dievca does not own crap…. so this is an editor’s edit.
Sometimes it takes 5 rounds before something goes, or not.
dievca hates the thought, “I should have kept that _________ (fill in the blank).”

OK, short version.

Weekly, dievca would like to offer pieces that make it through the rounds of editing and have been really useful in NYC. she suspects that they will be useful to others, too.

In no particular order:

#1: Baggu Reusable Shopping Bags

Can be carried in your hand or over your shoulder. Holds 2-3 plastic grocery bags worth of stuff.
Folds into a flat 5 in. x 5 in. pouch. Holds 50 lbs.

25.5 in. H x 15.5 in. W x 6 in. D.
100% ripstop nylon.
Machine washable.
$10

There are larger and smaller options, if you are interested. (click the link above)

dievca has bought these as gifts for New Yorkers, male and female, knowing they fit into a handbag or backpack easily. They are great for shopping, carrying garbage out of a park, collecting papers – anything you need to schlep in the City. The patterns change seasonally and can make a statement.
Yes, Master has some via dievca.

dievca’s Baggu nylon bags are going on 11 years old. she bought her first ones when the company started in 2007. They hold up and wash well.

dievca also has two Baggu leather bags, but that is more a statement on a classic casual handbag shape.
One in brown, one in black.


Sometimes you cannot get the original…

…but something fine comes along.  It’s different, however, it’s still fabulous.

Mind you, dievca’s favorite Nirvana band member is Dave Grohl.

She ran into this interview after watching the previous video: Dave Grohl’s Mom, Virginia, Talks About Raising A Rockstar Child. As a former educator and believer in different forms and paths for learning – dievca appreciates her take on raising her son effectively to be a musician.

The Seven Learning Styles
Visual (spatial):You prefer using pictures, images, and spatial understanding.
Aural (auditory-musical): You prefer using sound and music.
Verbal (linguistic): You prefer using words, both in speech and writing.
Physical (kinesthetic): You prefer using your body, hands and sense of touch.
Logical (mathematical): You prefer using logic, reasoning and systems.
Social (interpersonal): You prefer to learn in groups or with other people.
Solitary (intrapersonal): You prefer to work alone and use self-study.

dievca tends to run verbal and logical — as she mutters to herself and create lists and structures of knowledge (ask Master).

How do you learn effectively?

Your learning styles have more influence than you may realize. Your preferred styles guide the way you learn. They also change the way you internally represent experiences, the way you recall information, and even the words you choose.

Research shows us that each learning style uses different parts of the brain. By involving more of the brain during learning, we remember more of what we learn. Researchers using brain-imaging technologies have been able to find out the key areas of the brain responsible for each learning style.

For example:

  • Visual: The occipital lobes at the back of the brain manage the visual sense. Both the occipital and parietal lobes manage spatial orientation.
  • Aural: The temporal lobes handle aural content. The right temporal lobe is especially important for music.
  • Verbal: The temporal and frontal lobes, especially two specialized areas called Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas (in the left hemisphere of these two lobes).
  • Physical: The cerebellum and the motor cortex (at the back of the frontal lobe) handle much of our physical movement.
  • Logical: The parietal lobes, especially the left side, drive our logical thinking.
  • Social: The frontal and temporal lobes handle much of our social activities. The limbic system (not shown apart from the hippocampus) also influences both the social and solitary styles. The limbic system has a lot to do with emotions, moods and aggression.
  • Solitary: The frontal and parietal lobes, and the limbic system, are also active with this style.

With that information cooking in your brain, let dievca leave you with her favorite version of “Smells Like Teen Spirit”. Auditory only…XO

Thank you to Kottke for the Joan Jett/Nirvana videos and learning-styles-online.com.

 


How to get distracted by the accordion (pleats) – Lingerie

Anne Francis Vintage Lingerie – pleats

Look at how elegant it drapes. How thin the fabric is…how permanent the pleats are~

dievca started hunting for a nightgown with knife-pleats and she went into a tailspin of information and found out, it is a type of fabric not used in gowns very often.

First let’s define types of pleats:

Looks like the pleats in the original Nightgown are Accordion pleats:

Apparently accordion pleats hang down without poufing out and give volume via movement, not by the pleat itself. Nylon can be permanently pleated, silk cannot.

Here are the items dievca found so far….

Some from Etsy, already sold. Some without accordion pleats- but floaty, some with pin-tuck pleats, some are dresses not lingerie, some are short and not long….nothing was right.

This may be a QUEST!

The question is….is it worth dievca’s time?
Master?


she doesn’t know how or why this happened…

The question is, “Is dievca insane?”

dievca really didn’t care until she hit 37….then she completely moved into matching her bra and panties.  dievca doesn’t know how or why it happened, she just knows at what age she became obsessed. 

Then she went beyond internal matching and matches her outfits or does a tasteful contrast. Ask her trainer at the gym…she matches there.  That worked well for many years when Victoria’s Secret offered Body by Victoria matching bras and pants. dievca had full coverage unlined brown, orange, red, yellow, black, navy, turquoise, fuchsia, burgundy, white, light pink, purple, royal blue, olive-green….you get the picture.

They stopped making the type of bra that fit dievca well:

and the panties to match…dievca’s supply dwindled and is gone.

she tried to replace the match up with different brands, but its a job to keep looking out for different colors and seeing if they fit ok. she would really just like to go back to one store/brand and buy her selection of colors with the correct fit. Easy peasy…

In desperation she is looking at Victoria’s Secret, again, and will be head to a store on 34th Street. God help her~ The website doesn’t show an unlined full coverage bra, dievca does not need any kind of padding…at all, but she is hoping they might have something.

Does anyone else do this? Does anyone have suggestions on brands?
Guys, are you obsessive with matching your underwear to your outer clothing?
Help!


Proud as a Peacock!

Hedy Lamarr, wearing a ‘peacock dress’ in a promotional photo for the movie ‘Samson and Delilah’ (1949)

Meaningful Peacock Symbolism in Culture and History

The peacock might be thought to have some of the most admired human characteristics. They are a symbol of integrity and the beauty we can do when we endeavor to show our true colors.

In history, myth, legend and lore, the peacock symbolism carries portents of: Nobility, Holiness, Guidance, Protection and Watchfulness.

You might like to contemplate the powers of the peacock when you need more vibrancy and vitality in your Life

The peacock can rejuvenate self-esteem levels too. If you’re feeling “blah” and blue, imagine the glorious, techno-color display the peacock provides. This puts us in a proper mood to embrace your own nobility. In no time, you’ll be walking tall and proud as a peacock!

Here is a list of keywords linked to peacock symbolism:

Glory
Regal
Vision
Royalty
Freedom
Attraction
Expression
Spirituality
Awakening
Immortality
Refinement
Incorruptibility

In Greco-Roman mythology the peacock is identified with Hera (Juno) who created the peacock from Argus whose hundred eyes (seen on the tail feathers of the peacock) symbolize the vault of heaven and the eyes of the stars. (Note: there is something about Argus watching the bovine form of Io…..)

In Hinduism the peacock is associated with Lakshmi who is a deity representing benevolence, patience, kindness, compassion and good luck.

2009 Vera Wang Peacock Wedding Dress

Similar to Lakshmi, the peacock is associated with Kwan-yin in Asian spirituality. Kwan-yin (or Quan Yin) is also an emblem of love, compassionate watchfulness, good-will, nurturing, and kindheartedness. Legend has it that she chose to stay a mortal even though she could be immortal because she wished to stay behind and aid humanity in their spiritual evolution.

In Babylonia and Persia the peacock is a guardian to royalty, and is often seen in engravings upon royal thrones.

In Christianity, peacock symbolism represents the “all-seeing” church, along with the holiness and sanctity associated with it. Additionally, the peacock represents resurrection, renewal and immortality within the spiritual teachings of Christianity.

You know, the ego isn’t a bad thing, as the peacock clearly indicates. There’s a reason somebody coined the phrase, “proud as a peacock”. If you watch the male – they are about as cocky as they come. Showing off and wooing his ladies. It takes a lot of brass to attract a bevy of peahens. This is a symbolic nod to us encouraging us to get some hustle in our bustle. The Peacock reminds us sometimes it’s totally okay to flaunt our stuff and show off our skills. Peacock energy can remind us we are amazing, and we should fan out our assets to land the opportunities we are seeking.

No reason not to dress in fine feathers as a female, too – Alice + Olivia Peacock pieces to help:

 


PJ’s: Inner-wear, Outerwear, Male, Female – Lingerie History

Pajamas

are a garment for sleeping or lounging worn by men, women, and children. Pajamas may be one-piece or two-piece garments, but always consist of loosely fitting pants of various widths and lengths. Pajamas are traditionally viewed as utilitarian garments.

The word pajama comes from the Hindi “pae jama” or “pai jama,” meaning leg clothing, and its usage dates back to the Ottoman Empire. Alternate spellings include: paejamas, paijamas, pyjamas, and the abbreviated PJ’s. Pajamas were traditionally loose drawers or trousers tied at the waist with a drawstring or cord, and they were worn by both sexes in India, Iran, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Pajamas could be either tight-fitting throughout the entire leg, or full at waist and knees with tightness at calves and ankles. They were usually worn with a belted tunic extending to the knees. Although the word is Hindi, similar garments are found in traditional costume throughout the Middle and Far East.

Pajamas were adopted by Europeans while in these countries, and brought back as exotic lounge wear. Although the wearing of pajamas was not widespread until the twentieth century, they were appropriated as early as the seventeenth century as a signifier of status and worldly knowledge.

Claudette Colbert in men’s-style pajama, 1934. In the 1934 film comedy “It Happened One Night”, Claudette Colbert dons a pair of men’s-style pajamas in a bedroom scene with Clark Gable. This famous scene popularized the men’s pajama look among women.

Pajamas as Sleepwear

Pajamas are generally thought to have been introduced to the Western world around 1870, when British colonials, who had adopted them as an alternative to the traditional nightshirt, continued the practice upon their return. By the end of the nineteenth century, the term pajama was being used to describe a two-piece garment: both the pajamas (trousers) and the jacket-styled top worn with them.

By 1902, men’s pajamas were widely available alongside more traditional nightshirts and were available in fabrics like flannel and madras and had lost most of their exotic connotations. Pajamas were considered modern and suitable for an active lifestyle. The advertising copy in the 1902 Sears, Roebuck Catalogue suggested that they were: “Just the thing for traveling, as their appearance admits a greater freedom than the usual kind of nightshirts”.

WSJ Article: Do Men Really Wear Pajamas To Bed?

The streamlined, often androgynous fashions during the 1920’s helped to popularize the wearing of pajamas by women. While men’s pajamas were invariably made of cotton, silk, or flannel, women’s examples were often made of brightly printed silk or rayon and trimmed with ribbons and lace. Early examples featured a raised or natural waist with voluminous legs gathered at the ankle in a “Turkish trouser” style, while later examples featured straight legs and dropped waists, a reflection of the 1920’s silhouette. Throughout the century, pajamas would continue to reflect the fashionable ideal. The 1934 film It Happened One Night, featured a scene where Claudette Colbert wears a pair of men’s pajamas. That helped to popularize the menswear-styled pajama for women. (photo above)

With the popularity of unisex styling during the 1970’s, pajamas were often menswear inspired. Tailored satin pajamas had been popular since the 1920’s but were rediscovered during this period by both men and women. In this decade, ethnic styles based on the traditional dress of Vietnam and China were worn as anti-fashion and a statement about the wearer’s political views. This trend toward unisex and ethnic remains to this day and is particularly clear in women’s fashions, where the division between dress and undress has become blurred.

Let’s not forget the children. Young girls and boys are the largest group of Pajama wearers, especially in cold weather climates. History-wise, who had the footed “onsie” in fleece with a zipper? Cosy until you sweated profusely~ And remember this; Bananas In Pajamas

Pajamas as Fashion

This blurring of these boundaries began long ago. Women had begun experimenting with the adaptation of pajama-style trousers since the eighteenth century, but this was associated with masquerade costume, actresses, and prostitution, not with respectable women.

Pajamas began to be adapted into fashionable dress in the early years of the twentieth century when avantgarde designers promoted them as an elegant alternative to the tea gown. French couturier Paul Poiret launched pajama styles for both day and evening as early as 1911, and his influence played a large role in their eventual acceptance.

Beach pajamas, which were worn by the seaside and for walking on the boardwalk, were popularized by Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel in the early 1920s. The first beach pajamas were worn by the adventuresome few, but by the end of the decade had become acceptable dress for the average woman. Evening pajamas, intended to be worn as a new type of costume for informal dining at home, also became widely accepted during this decade. Evening pajamas would remain popular throughout the 1930s and would reemerge in the 1960s in the form of “palazzo pajamas.”

Palazzo pajamas were introduced by the Roman designer Irene Galitzine in 1960 for elegant but informal evening dress. They greatly influenced fashion during the 1960’s and continued into the casual 1970’s. Palazzo pajamas featured extremely wide legs and were often made of soft silk and decorated with beading and fringe. During the 1970’s, evening wear and lounge wear merged, as evening styles became increasingly simple and unstructured. Halston was particularly known for his bias-cut pantsuits of satin and crepe, which he called “pajama dressing.” In light of this, popular magazines suggested readers shop in the lingerie departments for their evening wear.

This increased informality of dress has made the evening pajama a staple in modern fashion, and the Asian influence on designers like Ralph Lauren and Giorgio Armani has blurred the boundaries between dress and undress even further. It is and trend that has come around a number of times and its likely the trend will continue well into the twenty-first century.

 

A HUGE “Thank You” to http://www.angelasancartier.net ,  August 23rd, 2009