Bodice Ripper (lingerie)

Photo: Starz King Louis XV and Claire Fraser, a still from Outlander

Racked: Why We Still Call Them Bodice Rippers

bodice ( /ˈbɒdɪs/) is an article of clothing for women, covering the body from the neck to the waist. In modern usage it typically refers to a specific type of upper garment common in Europe during the 16th to the 18th century, or to the upper part of a modern dress to distinguish it from the skirt and sleeves. The term comes from pair of bodies (because the garment was originally made in two pieces that fastened together, often by lacing) of matching or coordinated fabric, possibly with embroidery or beadwork.

This construction was standard for fashionable garments from the 18th century until the late 19th century, and had the advantages of allowing a voluminous skirt to be paired with a close-fitting bodice, and of allowing two or more bodices to be worn with the same skirt (e.g., a high-necked bodice and a low-necked bodice allowed the same skirt to serve for both day wear and evening wear). One-piece construction became more common after 1900 due to the trend for looser, more simply constructed clothing with narrower skirts.

One mid-19th-century style included the Agnes Sorel bodice, named after 15th-century royal mistress Agnes Sorel. This style was a day wear bodice, with a square-cut neckline that had a high front and back and bishop sleeves.

In current usage, bodice typically refers to an upper garment that has removable sleeves or no sleeves, often low-cut, It’s the type of bodice worn in Europe from the 16th century to the 18th century, either over a corset or in lieu of one. To make a fashionable shape and support the bust, the bodice was often stiffened with bents (a type of reed), or whalebone. The bodice was different from the corset of the time because it was intended to be worn over the other garments.

Bodices survive into modern times in the traditional or revived folk dress of many European countries (see, such as, Austrian dirndl or the Aboyne dress worn by Scottish highland dancers). They are also commonly seen today at Society for Creative Anachronism events or a Renaissance Fair.


What’s the meaning of the phrase ‘Bodice ripper’?

A sexually explicit romantic novel; usually in a historical setting and always with a plot involving the seduction of the heroine.

What’s the origin of the phrase ‘Bodice ripper’?

These books owe much in style to the work of English romantic novelists like Jane Austen and Emily Bronte. Nevertheless, the term itself is American. The first note in print is from The New York Times, December 1980:

“Women too have their pornography: Harlequin romances, novels of ‘sweet savagery,’ – bodice-rippers.”

It soon caught on and appears many times in the US press from that date onward. Here’s an early example, in a story about [then] emerging novelist, Danielle Steel, from the Syracuse Herald Journal, New York, 1983:

“I think of romance novels as kind of bodice rippers, Steel says.”

The genre is commercially highly successful, but isn’t taken seriously by most literary critics. Most examples are judged by more base criteria than the classic works of Austen or the Brontes. Bodice rippers are strictly formulaic and the plot usually involves a vulnerable heroine faced with a richer and more powerful male character, whom she initially dislikes. Later, she succumbs to lust and falls into his arms. The formula requires the books to be fat ‘page turner’, that is, a plot device, usually a seduction scene, must happen at frequent intervals. Depending on the author or publishing house style, the principal characters must marry. It is almost obligatory for the cover picture to show the swooning, ample-bosomed heroine.

Thank you to Wikipedia, Phrases.org. uk, etc.

And a little bit of Wind – whee!


It was a week…+SantaCon…

20171203_221430.jpg Don’t let the door hit your ass on the way out!


A Cold Nose and the Full Moon

Tonight’s Moon is the last full moon of the year and it should be a good one.

dievca caught the moon, yesterday evening, after walking home from sharing Ramen with a friend. (http://www.junmenramen.com/)
It was very close to full!

Photo: dievca 12/02/2017 NYC

December’s full moon is called the Cold Moon.
Tonight’s full moon will be a supermoon, and the only visible supermoon in 2017.

During her city wandering, dievca was wearing:

 

The moon becomes totally full at 10:47 a.m. EST (1547 GMT).

The best time to see a supermoon is just after sunset. Something called the “moon illusion” makes the moon appear even bigger: The closer it is to the horizon, the larger it looks. No one knows exactly why this happens, but it is probably has something to do with our eyes.

For those living in the mainland United States, the supermoon will rise at 4:29 p.m. local time in San Francisco and 5:26 p.m. in New York City. If you are in Honolulu, head outside at 6:25 p.m. Those in Anchorage, Alaska, can catch the moonrise at 4:28 p.m.

Find the sunrise and sunset times for your location click here.

dievca will be wishing you good health and joy on the Moon!


Happy Thanksgiving (repost)

Happy Thanksgiving!

Bird in Bondage

Nov. 28th, 2013


(old enough to remember) 8-Tracks!

dievca was rooting around eBay and ran into an 8 Track Tape of The Beatles: Abbey Road.

This threw her into a memory whirl of being younger than 5 years old, driving with her Mother in a Ford Mustang listening to Sesame Street and looking at the other 8 Track Tapes in the car.

There weren’t many in the car, so they are imprinted in dievca’s memory:


dievca immediately wanted to hear an 8 Track Tape play, again.

The songs fading out to the “Cla Chunk” sound from the player as it changes channels before fading back in. The tapes playing in a loop, the randomness of changing channels only to be transported to another song within the album created interesting playback possibilities. Don’t like what song is playing? Hit the channel button, Don’t like that song, hit it again. Musical roulette. Plus, simply put an 8 track cartridge in a player and the music played on a continuous loop for hours to enjoy.

Is there an 8 track tape comeback? Like record albums? Maybe. Music today is disposable, nothing more than a file on your computer or phone that you can’t touch. Words on a screen. 8 track tapes like vinyl records physically exist, hold it, analyze at the album cover. Like dievca did as a kid.

Another reason 8 track tapes might be coming back is the warm analog tape sound. They just sound better than the over-processed digital files of today. And of course, the hunt to discover and find some obscure albums. Take the Doug Kershaw: Spanish Moss album…where would you get that? In the early 1970’s dievca heard it over and over….she now obsesses over  the memory.

Maybe dievca could talk Master into buying an “at home” 8 Track Tape Player.
We could buy the 8 Tracks from here:

Wait! They are out of business, so let’s try eBay.
dievca knows that Master liked:

And this might create an opportunity to do a little 1970’s Cosplay:

Just as long as this doesn’t happen!
That would kill the groove~


Do you want that bun toasted?