Happy Summer Solstice 2017

May the Sun of Summer warm your Soul!


On the Dot!

Marilyn Monroe 1951 Polka Dot Bikini

America’s love affair with the polka dot might have started in 1926, when Miss America was photographed in a polka dot swimsuit.

In 1928, Disney introduced its cartoon darling “Minnie Mouse” wearing a polka dot dress and matching bow.  Minerva leans towards red, though it looks like she was open to color changes in 1930.

Throughout the 1930s, polka dot dresses appeared in stores, the fabric suddenly subversive, nipped in by ribbons and accentuated with bows.

In 1940, Tommy Dorsey and Frank Sinatra’s ballad “Polka Dots and Moonbeams” captured the height of America’s polka dot mania — that spring, the Los Angeles Times assured its readers, “You can sign your fashion life away on the polka-dotted line, and you’ll never regret it.”

Christian Dior New Look 1954 Dot Dress

We can see ‘Rosie the Riveter’s’ polka dot bandana, continuing the theme through the early 1940’s.

Later in the decade, the polka dot pattern became more “highbrow” when Christian Dior released his “New Look” collection of hourglass dresses, many styles bedecked with dots. After a wartime period of shifting gender roles, Dior told Vogue that his collection sought “to make women extravagantly, romantically, eyelash-battingly female” again.  Hollywood followed suit, and the ladylike print fast became popular with actresses.

In 1951, Monroe was famously photographed wearing a polka dot bikini (top photo). Nine years later, the release of Brian Hyland’s hit song, “Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini,” brought polka dots back into vogue.

Brian Hyland “Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini”

dievca wears polka dots once in awhile, Master’s favorite is a retro day dress:

Collectif Caterina Shirt Dress

Paul Smith

A couple of polka dot scarves have joined dievca’s closet.

But she got distracted by a few polka dot items for this Spring and Summer:

The Garnet Hill Starlet is in dievca’s closet for summer and she is eyeballing the Lindy Bop Juliet for walking on Master’s arm when he returns to NYC.
Do you have anything polka dot you swear by?
XO


Doin’ Disney~

A risqué illustration featuring 64 Disney characters showed up in Paul Krassner’s satirical US publication, The Realist, 50 years ago.

Originally published out of the offices of Mad, The Realist lays serious claim to being the world’s first and longest surviving underground magazine, running from 1958 to 2001.

In 2007, Krassner recounted to The Guardian how he was inspired to commission the drawing by Disney’s death in 1966:
“I decided to visit Disneyland for the first time. I asked the head of security if there was any special ceremony to mark his death.

“‘No,’ he replied. ‘We kept the park open. We felt that Mr Disney would have wanted it that way.’ This was the moment I realised that, although Disney had served as the Intelligent Designer for a whole stable of imaginary characters – repressing their libidos in the process – they were now mourning for him in a state of suspended animation.

“When I got home, I called Wally Wood, a staff artist for Mad magazine, and assigned him to create a black-and-white montage for the middle two pages of the May 1967 issue.”<

The artwork inspired irreverent t-shirts with Snow White and “the Sir Punks”, plus Minnie and Mickey going at it  selling at Seditionaries.  This was one of a number of graphics introduced into the historic store at 430 King’s Road early in 1978 by Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood.

HAPPY 50th ANNIVERSARY!


Let me tell you my Mood

Wouldn’t it be great to be able to tell your Dominant’s or submissive’s mood without having to ask? They’re baaaack!

The mood ring is thought to be invented by Joshua Reynolds, a New York City marketing executive who is said to have first popularized the rings in 1975. He saw a friend use a thermotropic tape on a child’s forehead to take their temperature (Do you remember those?) and thought the liquid crystals could be used elsewhere.  Reynolds marketed the rings as “portable biofeedback aids,” and he was able to convince the era’s most popular department store, Bonwit Teller, to carry them as accessories.

In the 1970’s dievca had one of the cheap metal versions – did you? Bonwit’s offered a silver version for $45 and the gold went for $250.  The ‘stone’ of a mood ring was a hollow quartz or glass shell containing thermotropic liquid crystals. Modern mood jewelry is usually made from a flat strip of liquid crystals with a protective coating.

Believing in a mood ring is like believing in astrology.  Mood rings can’t tell your emotional state with any degree of accuracy, but the crystals are calibrated to have a pleasing blue or green color at the average person’s normal resting peripheral temperature of 82 F (28 C). The crystals respond to changes in temperature by twisting. The twisting changes their molecular structure, which alters the wavelengths of light which are absorbed or reflected. ‘Wavelengths of light’ is another way of saying ‘color’, so when the temperature of the liquid crystals changes, so does their color.

As peripheral body temperature increases, which it does in response to passion and happiness, the crystals twist to reflect blue. When you are excited or stressed out, blood flow is directed away from the skin and more toward the internal organs, cooling the fingers, causing the crystals to twist the other direction, to reflect more yellow. In cold weather, or if the ring was damaged, the stone would be dark gray or black and unresponsive.

The jewelry firm Leo Black in NYC has brought back the mood rings in 14K Gold or Rose Gold which means they won’t discolor like dievca’s 1970’s ring.   Ah, well — her crystal busted, too, so her ring stayed black…

The Leo Black versions may look like dievca’s ring, they are more expensive than the Bonwit Teller versions, but what do you expect in 40 years?

  • 15mm x 11mm
  • Band tapers to 2mm
  • Available in yellow and rose gold
  • $1150.00


Aww, Mom…

Mother's DaySo happy she finally had a girl
(no idea the girl was a tomboy)

Such a gap between siblings
(no idea the girl would keep her young)

A shared interest in fashion
(didn’t realize the girl would keep her up-to-date)

The girl ended up bringing a great deal of Joy to her Mother.
(And her Mother shared her Life and Wisdom with the girl)

Look, my Mom can be a pain-in-the-a**. I can be one, too.
Like Mother, Like Daughter.
She puts up with me and loves me, unconditionally.
What more do you need from someone?
Right now my Mom is 90 lbs, soaking wet and she looks at me with my extra curves and says, “You are so beautiful, so healthy and strong – it’s lovely.”
– and I look at myself with new eyes.
That is love.

Aww, Mom, I love you.


Plump Pin-Up

Hilda –  Plump Size Pin-up Girl

Jessica Rabbit famously said, “I’m not bad. I’m just drawn that way.”
Unlikely pin-up sensation Hilda would agree.

Illustrator Duane Bryer’s love of plump women led to the birth of Hilda, an endearing and slightly goofy, beautiful curvy girl.

Bryers told the Arizona Daily Star in 2010: ‘I got the idea for a plumpy gal pin-up and thought I’d like to make it into a calendar series. But how was I going to sell a plump girl?’

He then brought the series to the U.S.’s top calendar maker at the time, Brown & Bigelow, who ‘reluctantly put it in the line and figured it would last a short time.’

Hilda lived in the 1950s to 1980s and reached the peak of her fame in the 1960s. During that time, she was one of the best-loved calendar pin-up girls, alongside the likes of Marilyn Monroe. From lounging in long underwear and teddies to biking and sailing adventures in bikinis, Hilda embodies a spirit of innocence, playfulness and effortless charm.

 

In past reality, Hilda may have been less prominent because of her curvaceous figure,  but thanks to the internet she is making a comeback.
dievca appreciates the glory of a Zaftig Pin-Up.
There is hope for dievca, yet! XO


Hilda Plus Size Pin Up
Thanks to RebelsMarket and the DailyMail


An 80’s sweater drives the plan for Farmer’s Market

It’s been grey, than sunny, cool then warm…layers were the call for the day.
To counteract the dreary weather, the plan started with a POP of color from a vintage I.MAGNIN aqua cashmere sweater.

The pickings at the 79th Street Greenmarket were either left overs from autumn (apples) or early Spring offerings. dievca picked up a Foodie’s Favorite:
RAMPS

she had never heard of the coveted Spring Onion, but she can tell you that the smell and taste of them is divine. Something dievca will be sharing with Master, asap.

A little about Ramps from http://www.wildwestvirginiaramps.com:

Allium tricoccum (commonly known as ramps or wild leeks) is an early spring vegetable, a perennial wild onion with a strong garlic-like odor and a pronounced onion flavor. Wild Ramps are found across eastern North America, from the U.S. state of South Carolina to Canada. They are popular in the cuisines of the rural uplands of the American South, and also in the Canadian province of Quebec.

Both the white lower leaf stalks and the broad green leaves are edible.

In Canada, ramps are considered rare delicacies. Since the growth of Wild Ramps is not as widespread as in Appalachia and because of destructive human practices, ramps are a threatened species in Quebec. Allium tricoccum is a protected species under Quebec legislation. A person may have Wild Ramps in his or her possession outside the plant’s natural environment, or may harvest it for the purposes of personal consumption in an annual quantity not exceeding 200 grams of any of its parts or a maximum of 50 bulbs or 50 plants, provided those activities do not take place in a park within the meaning of the National Parks Act.