Patience

Rilke:
Have patience with everything that remains unsolved in your heart.
Try to love the questions themselves, like locked rooms and like books written in a foreign language.
Do not now look for the answers.
They cannot now be given to you because you could not live them.
It is a question of experiencing everything.
At present you need to live the question.
Perhaps you will gradually, without even noticing it, find yourself experiencing the answer.


Sharing the giving of Thanks in NYC

The Mickey Mouse balloon debuted at the 1934 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade

dievca has a lot to be Thankful for and she will take a moment today to think on that and she is sure a number of other people will be doing the same thing across the USA. Maybe the World would like to join in for a moment of Thanks (except for Canada…they already had their Thanksgiving~).

And if not, maybe you might be interested in the History of the NYC Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade which (like many USA traditions)….started as an advertising gimmick:

Macy’s Day Parade: The Beginnings

The first-ever Macy’s Day Parade actually took place on Christmas of 1924. Macy’s employees dressed as clowns, cowboys, and other fun costumes, and traveled with Central Park zoo animals and creative floats a lengthy six miles from Herald Square to Harlem in Manhattan.

NYC's Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade: The Humpty Dumpty Float- 1926

NYC’s Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade: The Humpty Dumpty Float- 1926

The parade was meant to draw attention to the Macy’s store in NYC, and the gimmick worked – more than 250,000 people attended the inaugural Macy’s Day Parade. It was decided that this NYC parade would become an annual NY event in Manhattan.

In 1927, Felix the Cat became the first giant balloon to ever take part in the Macy’s Day Parade. In 1928, Felix was inflated with helium, and without a plan to deflate this massive balloon, NYC parade organizers simply let Felix fly off into the sky. Unfortunately, he popped soon afterwards.

The Macy’s Day Parade continued to let the balloons fly off in following years, only these balloons would have a return address written on them, and whoever found the balloon could return the balloon for a prize from Macy’s. However, the results of this experiment weren’t exactly successful….

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade Continues to Grow

The Eddie Cantor Balloon in the 1940 Thanksgiving Day Parade New York

The Eddie Cantor Balloon in the 1940 Thanksgiving Day Parade New York

Despite the Great Depression, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade continued to grow through the 1930’s. The first national radio broadcast of the Macy’s Parade Thanksgiving took place in 1932. Two years later, Disney got in on the giant balloon fun, introducing the Mickey Mouse balloon in 1934. By then, more than one million people were attending this popular parade in NYC, and those fortunate enough to own a TV could see the broadcast on NBC starting in 1939.

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York was temporarily suspended from 1942- 1944 for World War II. In an effort to help America’s cause, the rubber used to make the Macy’s Day Parade floats were donated to the American military. More than two million people attended the 1945 Macy’s Day Parade, and this popular New York City event has continued to grow ever since.

Today, more than 8,000 people take part in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade each year, and it takes another 4,000 dedicated volunteers to put together this NYC Thanksgiving celebration. Both NBC and CBS broadcast the New York City parade nationwide, and this NYC event still attracts high-profile musicians and the most talented Broadway performers.

Fun Facts about the NYC Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

Did you know…

Like today, children then also loved the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade

Like today, children then also loved the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade

  • The inaugural Macy’s Day Parade took place on Christmas, 1924.
  • Over 250,000 people attended the first Macy’s Day Parade in NYC.
  • In 1927, Felix the Cat became the first giant balloon featured at the Macy’s Day Parade.
  • The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade New York was first broadcast on the radio in 1932.
  • One million people attended the 1933 Thanksgiving Day Parade in NYC.
  • In 1934, Mickey Mouse made his giant balloon debut at this famous New York City parade.
  • The Macy’s Day Parade floats were pulled by horses until 1939.
  • 1939 was also the first year NBC broadcast the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. NBC continues to be the official broadcast station of the Macy’s Parade, though CBS also carries the parade unofficially. 50 million viewers tune in to this New York parade each year.
  • Because of Word War II, there was no Macy’s Day Parade from 1942-1944. During that time, the rubber and helium originally meant to blow up the famous Macy’s balloons were donated to the American military.
  • The 1945 Macy’s Day Parade surpassed 2 million people in attendance.
  • Six days after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade went ahead as scheduled in hopes of raising the national spirit.
  • Snoopy – the Peanuts character created by Charles Schultz – holds the distinction of having the most Thanksgiving Day NYC Parade floats, with six different balloons since 1968.
  • Because of heavy rain, the 1971 Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade was forced to ground all giant balloons, making it the first Macy’s Parade without balloons since 1926.

A dachsund parade balloon in Times Square - 1950's

A dachsund parade balloon in Times Square – 1950s

  • Today’s Macy’s Day Parade features over a dozen giant balloons, nearly 30 parade floats, 1,500 dancers and cheerleaders, more than 750 clowns, several marching bands from around the country, and over 8,000 participants in all!
  • The giant balloon inflation is open to the public, and takes place from 3pm-10pm the evening before Thanksgiving on 77th and 81st streets between Central Park West and Columbus Ave.
  • 4,000 volunteers take the time each year to put on this NYC Thanksgiving celebration.
  • The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade route is 2.65 miles long.
  • 3.5 million people attend the Macy’s Day Parade each year.
  • The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade is the second-oldest in the country, behind the 6ABC Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in Philadelphia.

(Thank you to NYC Tourist for the compilation of the history, modifications made by dievca)


Lingerie with a History: Lucile–Fashion Designer, Titanic Survivor

Pavillon Mars was the opulent residence in Versailles where Lady Duff Gordon (photo below) lived whilst designing for her Parisian clients. This collection echoes her home’s lavishness, hand crafted with French eyelash lace this collection combines classic black lingerie with contemporary soft metallic detailing which creates a subtle and sophisticated shimmer throughout all pieces.

Lucile Lingerie

There is a lovely Vogue article about Lady Duff Gordon – who survived the sinking of the Titanic and scandal, who was known for her Fashion Designs – including lingerie designs under the name “Lucile” – click the photo for her story.

Lady Duff Gordon Lucile Photograph by Baron Adolph de Meyer 1915


Avoiding the Costume on Halloween~


dievca puts the pumpkin on her door to let kids know she is open to Trick-Or-Treating, she cuts fresh pumpkins for Jack-O-Lanterns, she loves seeing the kids in costumes.
she can’t seem to generate as much energy and enthusiasm for adults in costume….listening to a friend bleat about a costume of a pregnant Ripley from Alien doesn’t inspire her.
And the thought she has a Halloween engagement party AND a Halloween-themed wedding really doesn’t grab her. (Two different couples)

Apparently, she is no fun~

Under that duress of that looming costume engagement party AND wedding, dievca is trying to figure out a way to work some type of clothing that doesn’t make her a curmudgeon.

Can she get drink over here?

Inspired by air-breathing arthropods that have eight legs…

Here is her spring-board of possible items:

OK, the last photo is IT! Look how adorable on a kid – what a mess on an adult.
Help, this ship is sinking.


Getting back at it in Style!

Always trying to look like a Lady.
dievca is considering her workout in heels~
she did tell her trainer that her quads held up well in 3.5 inches heels
and that she plans to wear heels for the next 3 decades…
You always need a goal!

 


“Over the hills and through”…the Overwire Bra

The overwire bra was popular during the 1950s and created a slightly softer look than the bullet bra. The cups are wired above the chest, creating a beautiful projected bust and often the bra features a deep V in the center, making it perfect for low-cut strapless dresses The placement of the wire doesn’t really do any technical function like the underwire of today, instead, it offers a different shape compared to other bras. The overwire did feature heavily in strapless bras as the wire helped defy gravity by keeping the bra shape intact.

Modern overwire bras are a niche market and you’ll find the odd one being produced by vintage/retro reproduction lingerie companies: Bettie Page Lingerie and Dita von Teese Lingerie or you can just buy vintage…


And, yes, dievca took liberties in combining “Over the River and Through the Woods”, plus “Over the Hill and Through the Woods” for the title…


How to get distracted by the accordion (pleats) – Lingerie

Anne Francis Vintage Lingerie – pleats

Look at how elegant it drapes. How thin the fabric is…how permanent the pleats are~

dievca started hunting for a nightgown with knife-pleats and she went into a tailspin of information and found out, it is a type of fabric not used in gowns very often.

First let’s define types of pleats:

Looks like the pleats in the original Nightgown are Accordion pleats:

Apparently accordion pleats hang down without poufing out and give volume via movement, not by the pleat itself. Nylon can be permanently pleated, silk cannot.

Here are the items dievca found so far….

Some from Etsy, already sold. Some without accordion pleats- but floaty, some with pin-tuck pleats, some are dresses not lingerie, some are short and not long….nothing was right.

This may be a QUEST!

The question is….is it worth dievca’s time?
Master?