And your plans for this evening?

Frank Sinatra at the Playboy Club in London 1966

Master is chasing a little tail…

 


Planet Claire and beyond

As a child, dievca didn’t get to stay up late very often.  she and her Dad had to be out of the house and on the road by 5 am to get to practice by 5:45 am.  That meant an early bed time.

But for some reason in 1980 dievca snuck out of bed on a Saturday Night and saw this on her parent’s TV:

THE B52’S ROCK LOBSTER ON SNL SHOW IN 1980
Click the link — the video was not available on youtube.

It was her first introduction to Saturday Night Live.
(and the B-52’s)
The show was hosted by Terry Garr and had a Bill Murray SNL classic commercial “Anticipation”.

dievca was fascinated.

Why did this trip down memory lane occur?

dievca ran into this Miu Miu dress and it threw her into a B-52’s swirl, starting with a trip to Planet Claire:

Click photo to purchase

Completely “Planet Claire”, right?

dievca’s envisioning a B-52’s party wearing the dress, Big teased Hair (a beehive) and cat eyes eye-liner.  This could also be a really weird/fun Presentation Outfit for Master. Sassy, bubble gum, retro kinda like this


Inspiration: (the evolution of a Presentation Outfit)

Click on the photo to watch the dance number “Big Spender” from Sweet Charity.

The minute you walked in the joint 
I could see you were a man of distinction 
A real big spender 
Good lookin’ so refined 
Say, wouldn’t you like to know what’s goin’ on in my mind? 
So let me get right to the point 
I don’t pop my cork for every man I see 
Hey big spender, 
Spend a little time with me.

Walking the streets of NYC, dievca spotted two sexy mannequins.  It brought to mind some sassy dancing from the movie “Sweet Charity”.  A presentation outfit was channeled — something different for Master. “Diversity, dievca, Diversity.”

  • Short Sparkly Dress, form-fitting (Milly)
  • Big Hair (dievca’s has grown back)
  • Large Drop Earrings (Kenneth Jay Lane)
  • Black Heels (Monse or Manolo Blahnik)
  • Smoky Eyes (Urban Decay)
  • Deep Lip Color (Mac)
  • Well-Stretched Body
  • Bob Fosse Moves
  • “Hey, Big Spender” playing in the background.


A Feminist Cry = sensible dress = Bloomers (lingerie)

“And now I’m dressed like a little girl, in a dress both loose and short,
Oh with what freedom I can sing, and walk all ‘round about!
And when I get a little strength, some work I think I can do,
‘Twill give me health and comfort, and make me useful too.”
— The Sibyl magazine, April 15, 1859

Originally, Bloomers, also called the bloomer, the Turkish dress, the American dress, or simply reform dress, are divided women’s garments for the lower body. They were developed in the 19th century as a healthful and comfortable alternative to the heavy, constricting dresses worn by women.

Amelia Jenks Bloomer (May 27, 1818 – December 30, 1894) was an American women’s rights and temperance advocate. Even though she did not create the women’s clothing reform style known as bloomers, her name became associated with it because of her early and strong advocacy.

Bloomers, as lingerie, are baggy underwear that extends to just below or above the knee and fastened. (Can be known as “knickers” or “directoire knickers”).  Bloomers were worn for several decades during the first part of the 20th century, but are not widely worn today.

Often the term “bloomers” has been used interchangeably with the pantalettes worn by women and girls in the mid 19th century and the open leg knee-length drawers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Something for CosPlay or DD/bg?

PS: Also a nickname for cheerleading briefs. 😀

 


Nod to Noir!

Charlotte Olympia’s knack for creating whimsical footwear
is embodied by these Killer Heels.

The 1940s-inspired shoes include:

  • peep-toe style
  • black suede
  • contrasting newspaper-style ‘Gazette’ printed satin-covered block heel
  • broken heart appliqué
  • black organza ruffle trim
  • embellished with crystal studs
  • velvet front strap in a bow
  • back strap is in metallic-gold leather with a buckle

They make the perfect finish for a ruffled midi skirt and silk blouse.
A look that takes the retro influence further~


Finding a Way (Presentation Outfit)

dievca is curvy.

That makes wearing certain styles a trick. And normally, dievca just avoids those styles.

For instance,
a 1960’s Go-Go mini-skirt shift dress:

It is a style dievca avoids….
until she saw Master looking at a museum exhibition of them with fondness.
Obviously, the fashion holds some great memories for Him.

So, now she has taken on the Go-Go Dress as a Presentation Outfit for Master.

dievca plans to buy one and get it altered to her curves as best as possible
or she might have a friend make her a dress with a vintage pattern.
Then it will be the quest for Go-Go Boots.
Poufy hair and cat eyes are not a problem.

Add a little groovy music and maybe dievca will swing her Master’s memories back here:

“Very often in the old fashion style of dancing, we may not feel particularly in a romantic mood and yet, very often, our partner would grab us and dance very close and hold us so closely – and I like this because, your know, we can completely keep it arms length and dance however we please, and ah – I really like that.”

Hopefully, Master will dance with His dievca at arms length
and then invite her to sit on His lap.
Perhaps His hands will wander up her mini-skirt.
We will see!


Bodice Ripper (lingerie)

Photo: Starz King Louis XV and Claire Fraser, a still from Outlander

Racked: Why We Still Call Them Bodice Rippers

bodice ( /ˈbɒdɪs/) is an article of clothing for women, covering the body from the neck to the waist. In modern usage it typically refers to a specific type of upper garment common in Europe during the 16th to the 18th century, or to the upper part of a modern dress to distinguish it from the skirt and sleeves. The term comes from pair of bodies (because the garment was originally made in two pieces that fastened together, often by lacing) of matching or coordinated fabric, possibly with embroidery or beadwork.

This construction was standard for fashionable garments from the 18th century until the late 19th century, and had the advantages of allowing a voluminous skirt to be paired with a close-fitting bodice, and of allowing two or more bodices to be worn with the same skirt (e.g., a high-necked bodice and a low-necked bodice allowed the same skirt to serve for both day wear and evening wear). One-piece construction became more common after 1900 due to the trend for looser, more simply constructed clothing with narrower skirts.

One mid-19th-century style included the Agnes Sorel bodice, named after 15th-century royal mistress Agnes Sorel. This style was a day wear bodice, with a square-cut neckline that had a high front and back and bishop sleeves.

In current usage, bodice typically refers to an upper garment that has removable sleeves or no sleeves, often low-cut, It’s the type of bodice worn in Europe from the 16th century to the 18th century, either over a corset or in lieu of one. To make a fashionable shape and support the bust, the bodice was often stiffened with bents (a type of reed), or whalebone. The bodice was different from the corset of the time because it was intended to be worn over the other garments.

Bodices survive into modern times in the traditional or revived folk dress of many European countries (see, such as, Austrian dirndl or the Aboyne dress worn by Scottish highland dancers). They are also commonly seen today at Society for Creative Anachronism events or a Renaissance Fair.


What’s the meaning of the phrase ‘Bodice ripper’?

A sexually explicit romantic novel; usually in a historical setting and always with a plot involving the seduction of the heroine.

What’s the origin of the phrase ‘Bodice ripper’?

These books owe much in style to the work of English romantic novelists like Jane Austen and Emily Bronte. Nevertheless, the term itself is American. The first note in print is from The New York Times, December 1980:

“Women too have their pornography: Harlequin romances, novels of ‘sweet savagery,’ – bodice-rippers.”

It soon caught on and appears many times in the US press from that date onward. Here’s an early example, in a story about [then] emerging novelist, Danielle Steel, from the Syracuse Herald Journal, New York, 1983:

“I think of romance novels as kind of bodice rippers, Steel says.”

The genre is commercially highly successful, but isn’t taken seriously by most literary critics. Most examples are judged by more base criteria than the classic works of Austen or the Brontes. Bodice rippers are strictly formulaic and the plot usually involves a vulnerable heroine faced with a richer and more powerful male character, whom she initially dislikes. Later, she succumbs to lust and falls into his arms. The formula requires the books to be fat ‘page turner’, that is, a plot device, usually a seduction scene, must happen at frequent intervals. Depending on the author or publishing house style, the principal characters must marry. It is almost obligatory for the cover picture to show the swooning, ample-bosomed heroine.

Thank you to Wikipedia, Phrases.org. uk, etc.