Bodice Ripper (lingerie)

Photo: Starz King Louis XV and Claire Fraser, a still from Outlander

Racked: Why We Still Call Them Bodice Rippers

bodice ( /ˈbɒdɪs/) is an article of clothing for women, covering the body from the neck to the waist. In modern usage it typically refers to a specific type of upper garment common in Europe during the 16th to the 18th century, or to the upper part of a modern dress to distinguish it from the skirt and sleeves. The term comes from pair of bodies (because the garment was originally made in two pieces that fastened together, often by lacing) of matching or coordinated fabric, possibly with embroidery or beadwork.

This construction was standard for fashionable garments from the 18th century until the late 19th century, and had the advantages of allowing a voluminous skirt to be paired with a close-fitting bodice, and of allowing two or more bodices to be worn with the same skirt (e.g., a high-necked bodice and a low-necked bodice allowed the same skirt to serve for both day wear and evening wear). One-piece construction became more common after 1900 due to the trend for looser, more simply constructed clothing with narrower skirts.

One mid-19th-century style included the Agnes Sorel bodice, named after 15th-century royal mistress Agnes Sorel. This style was a day wear bodice, with a square-cut neckline that had a high front and back and bishop sleeves.

In current usage, bodice typically refers to an upper garment that has removable sleeves or no sleeves, often low-cut, It’s the type of bodice worn in Europe from the 16th century to the 18th century, either over a corset or in lieu of one. To make a fashionable shape and support the bust, the bodice was often stiffened with bents (a type of reed), or whalebone. The bodice was different from the corset of the time because it was intended to be worn over the other garments.

Bodices survive into modern times in the traditional or revived folk dress of many European countries (see, such as, Austrian dirndl or the Aboyne dress worn by Scottish highland dancers). They are also commonly seen today at Society for Creative Anachronism events or a Renaissance Fair.


What’s the meaning of the phrase ‘Bodice ripper’?

A sexually explicit romantic novel; usually in a historical setting and always with a plot involving the seduction of the heroine.

What’s the origin of the phrase ‘Bodice ripper’?

These books owe much in style to the work of English romantic novelists like Jane Austen and Emily Bronte. Nevertheless, the term itself is American. The first note in print is from The New York Times, December 1980:

“Women too have their pornography: Harlequin romances, novels of ‘sweet savagery,’ – bodice-rippers.”

It soon caught on and appears many times in the US press from that date onward. Here’s an early example, in a story about [then] emerging novelist, Danielle Steel, from the Syracuse Herald Journal, New York, 1983:

“I think of romance novels as kind of bodice rippers, Steel says.”

The genre is commercially highly successful, but isn’t taken seriously by most literary critics. Most examples are judged by more base criteria than the classic works of Austen or the Brontes. Bodice rippers are strictly formulaic and the plot usually involves a vulnerable heroine faced with a richer and more powerful male character, whom she initially dislikes. Later, she succumbs to lust and falls into his arms. The formula requires the books to be fat ‘page turner’, that is, a plot device, usually a seduction scene, must happen at frequent intervals. Depending on the author or publishing house style, the principal characters must marry. It is almost obligatory for the cover picture to show the swooning, ample-bosomed heroine.

Thank you to Wikipedia, Phrases.org. uk, etc.

Cha Cha Cha – a break from the Holidays

Impero London Swarovski Crystal & Black Leather Luxury Hestia Collar Choker 270 BPD (click photo to buy)

dievca is looking for a presentation outfit for Master and she is burned out by the Holidays (yes…already). The song above inspired an outfit. Should be fun to wear for your Sir or Madame to change it up.

Norma Kamali Fringe Shorts

Black Fringe Burlesque Bra

Red Satin Gloves

Black Sheer Cuban Heel Stay-up Stockings

Christian Louboutin Black Patent Leather Stiletto

Big Hair (it’s finally longer)
Cat Eyes and Mascara (Black)
Red Lips (Mac Russian Red)
Black Spinel Oxidized Silver Stud Earrings

Now to hit youtube to review the Cha-Cha-Cha moves!


soubrette (lingerie)

The sexy French Maid costume, the “soubrette” in France, is a form of ladies’ fantasy wear. One of the more popular costumes used as lingerie.

During the XIXth century, housemaids who served in wealthy French families wore simple, black-and-white afternoon uniforms.

Boys will be boys – and there were maids whose role wasn’t limited to keeping the house clean. Occasional sexual intercourse, discreet affairs, or even sexual harassment were a part of the deal in houses where the “Monsieur” was eager to use his power to satisfy his sexual appetite…

As the XIXth century developed many theatrical productions, especially in Paris, Maids were often portrayed in plays. A la ville comme à la scène, they had a stereotypical role in … bedrooms farces…

Nowadays, the design of the French maid dress can range widely, but seems to have several common traits :

  • A black with white trim one-piece dress with a full skirt at or above knee-length.
  • White half-apron, usually with ruffle or lace
  • A ruffled or lace headpiece
  • Long stockings or tights (nude or black)
  • High heels
  • Feather-duster
  • White lace garter

The costume is strongly eroticized- often used in cosplay, as a fetish, foreplay and BDSM.

Nevertheless, even if its use is recreational, it still bears the original old-fashioned idea of sexual domination. The costume keeps on having a scandalous aura, historically involving a strong man dominating a woman…

The idea of a French Maid intent on her cleaning of a personal space with a feather duster being grabbed from behind for a little anal sex comes to mind…

Marilyn Monroe in a french maid dress she wore in “There’s No Business Like Show Business”

A Thank You to Anne Marquet on Quora.

(old enough to remember) 8-Tracks!

dievca was rooting around eBay and ran into an 8 Track Tape of The Beatles: Abbey Road.

This threw her into a memory whirl of being younger than 5 years old, driving with her Mother in a Ford Mustang listening to Sesame Street and looking at the other 8 Track Tapes in the car.

There weren’t many in the car, so they are imprinted in dievca’s memory:


dievca immediately wanted to hear an 8 Track Tape play, again.

The songs fading out to the “Cla Chunk” sound from the player as it changes channels before fading back in. The tapes playing in a loop, the randomness of changing channels only to be transported to another song within the album created interesting playback possibilities. Don’t like what song is playing? Hit the channel button, Don’t like that song, hit it again. Musical roulette. Plus, simply put an 8 track cartridge in a player and the music played on a continuous loop for hours to enjoy.

Is there an 8 track tape comeback? Like record albums? Maybe. Music today is disposable, nothing more than a file on your computer or phone that you can’t touch. Words on a screen. 8 track tapes like vinyl records physically exist, hold it, analyze at the album cover. Like dievca did as a kid.

Another reason 8 track tapes might be coming back is the warm analog tape sound. They just sound better than the over-processed digital files of today. And of course, the hunt to discover and find some obscure albums. Take the Doug Kershaw: Spanish Moss album…where would you get that? In the early 1970’s dievca heard it over and over….she now obsesses over  the memory.

Maybe dievca could talk Master into buying an “at home” 8 Track Tape Player.
We could buy the 8 Tracks from here:

Wait! They are out of business, so let’s try eBay.
dievca knows that Master liked:

And this might create an opportunity to do a little 1970’s Cosplay:

Just as long as this doesn’t happen!
That would kill the groove~


What is a Petticoat? (cosplay – lolita, goth)

Petticoat = an underskirt.

Petticoats were prominent throughout the 16th to 20th centuries.

Today, petticoats are typically worn to add fullness to skirts in the Gothic and Lolita subcultures.

The History:

18th Century with Panniers

18th Century with Bustle

Late 19th Century with Dust Ruffle

1950s net petticoat, handmade by Ryley & Flynn Vintage. Deluxe 4 layer satin trimmed.

CANDY ANTHONY – 50’s Tea Length Yellow Petticoat & Silk Sash

Cosplay: Lolita Net Mesh

Goth: Penoze Naughty black red petticoat

Goth: cage petticoat

Goth: Collezione Parah Autunno Inverno 2015-2016 petticoat

Goth: Collezione Parah Autunno Inverno 2015-2016 petticoat models

And if you were wondering what the difference is between a crinoline and a petticoat:

crinoline /krɪn.əl.ɪn/ is a stiffened or structured petticoat designed to hold out a woman’s skirt, popular at various times since the mid-19th century. Originally,crinoline described a stiff fabric made of horsehair (“crin”) and cotton or linen which was used to make underskirts and as a dress lining.

 


Cosplay Auction featuring Latex

All Sassy Cosplay items are on Auction
at 2nd & 64th Street.
Ends on August 30th, around 9pm EST.


Tiki Time

(1950’s Household Kink: presenting for your Sir/Master/Madame)

dievca was cutting a pineapple to share with Master and the idea for becoming a Pineapple Princess and pulling from Tiki Culture flashed through her head.

Pineapple Princess, 1939

Cue the Annette Funicello:

(click record to play)

THE HISTORY
The advent of Tikidom can be traced back to a man named “Don the Beachcomber”, aka “Donn Beach”, aka “Donn Beach-Comber”… or, less interestingly, Ernest Raymond Beaumont Gantt. Gantt was a Texan born in 1907, but he knew there was a whole world outside the steak-scented borders of the Lone Star State, so he traveled to the rum-scented Caribbean and South Pacific and learned a lot about how to chill on the way.

When Don returned to the States, he wanted to emulate the laid-back times he experienced in the tropics, so he opened the world’s first Tiki bar, Don the Beachcomber, in Los Angeles in 1934. People — including celebrities — flocked to the bar for its escapist ambiance, potent-but-tasty rum cocktails, and exotic cuisine (which was actually slightly modified Cantonese food, but still — not very typical for the times).

Also in 1934, “Trader” Vic Bergeron opened a similar bar in Oakland (originally called Hinky Dinks, but changed to Trader Vic’s in 1937) that also drew crowds for its Polynesian-themed drinks and food. Because of its success, Vic was able to open more locations in places like Seattle and Hawaii (before statehood!). A fad was developing.

FORBIDDEN ISLAND
During World War II, Gantt was deployed, so his wife took over management of the bar and expanded it into a chain with 16 locations. Tiki culture — inspired by the art, style, and attitudes of Polynesia — became huge in America during the 1940s and ‘50s, and fueled the two chains’ success even more, because people wanted to experience a time away from work and stress.

Tiki bars fell out of the public eye for a while between the ‘60s and ‘90s, but experienced a resurgence thanks to a few dedicated Tiki acolytes, who started up bars based on the original Don the Beachcomber and Trader Vic’s.

Your typical Tiki cocktail is a mix of light or dark rum, flavored syrups, and tropical fruit juices — which is essentially the recipe for the Mai Tai (rum, orange Curacao, syrup, lime juice), the first Tiki drink to have widespread popularity after it was (allegedly) invented by Trader Vic in 1944.

Ingredients:
1 oz amber rum
1 oz dark rum
1 oz fresh lime juice
½ oz orgeat syrup
½ oz Cointreau
1 sprig of fresh mint and a piece of a pineapple
Umbrella

Add all the ingredients to a cocktail shaker except the mint and pineapple. Shake and strain into a high ball glass filled with ice. Garnish with the fresh mint and pineapple, you can float some extra dark rum on top.

CUTE LITTLE UMBRELLAS
Rumor has it that the umbrellas were originally developed as a way of keeping the ice in a drink cold on a warm day out on the beach. They were popularized by Trader Vic in the 1930s, and caught on from there. 

Information is condensed and modified from an article by Adam Lapetina a food/drink staff writer at Thrillist

You could go with a range of clothing for your Sir or Madam, from grass skirts, no top with leis or more 1950’s Household Kink with a retro dress or Hawaiian shirt in a kitschy pattern. dievca was hooked on being a Pineapple Princess when she ran into these dresses from Loco Lindo:


Can you imagine serving your Sir or Madame a Mai Tai on their arrival home and kneeling to offer them fresh pineapple from the husk. Perhaps a little 1950’s/1960’s beach music in the background. And an interesting tie bikini or swimsuit trunks under your kitschy 1950’s Print dress/top. Could be a lot of innocent, or a little more, risqué Fun!

Just because…
dievca would like to offer some sweet and innocent items she ran into while researching being a Pineapple Princess and Tiki Culture — who knows maybe the onesies would be of use after creating an excellent Cosplay moment + 9 months. XO

Disneyland History – Enchanted Tiki Room