A disaster or a treat?


dievca raced out of work early to get to the Ballet.
Grabbing her ticket at “Will Call”, she had enough time to get a glass of Champagne and a ChocoLove Raspberry/Dark Chocolate bar.

As she sat in the lobby for a 5 minute gulp, she looked around at the people who were dressed up for the ballet.

Beautiful.

But not dievca.
she barely made it from a bike ride and the subway.

Her plumage was practical:

 

It was ok, she was hidden on the side of the 4th floor the peanut gallery.

The 5:00 am work start that morning had dievca nodding off during the first two pieces. she wondered how she would make it through to the final piece she wanted to see.

After intermission, falling asleep wasn’t problem. The brutal ballet “Odessa” about Jewish Organized Crime after the Russian Revolution kept her awake. Set to the fabulous music from a Russian movie, “Sunset”, the choreography was intense and amazing. Some of the critiques called out the “gang rape scene” (NYT’s Article) But, history isn’t always pretty. It was the telling of a story.

Sterling Hyltin, thrown into the air by male dancers in a scene of violence on the opening night of “Odessa,” at New York City / THE NEW YORK TIMES Andrea Mohin

The last piece was what dievca went to see, “The Times Are Racing” , and she enjoyed that the couples pairings changed for the final performance. Boy-to-Boy instead of Girl-to-Boy (the Girl did a kick-A** job in the tap dance piece). But, she was still stuck on the stunning one-two punch of Odessa and that remains the surprise winner in her mind.

Although dievca loves to dress up, sliding out into the night with her hiking boots wasn’t a disaster. dievca decided that champagne, chocolate, ballet and being comfortable make for an excellent evening by herself.


Sometimes You are Ready: Dreaming of a new Play Collar and Lead

BDSM leans towards black leather, studs, locks
– serious accouterments.

Master and dievca came at dievca’s presentation and their playing with a more lighthearted approach. Colorful or embellished Play Collars, elegant chokers for Presentation in public.

Black Leather and Rhinestone Play Collar


Master and dievca have beautiful play collars and leads:

Sometimes you just need a plain black collar for Presentation.
(Are you seeing a theme with the combat boots? What is up with dievca?)

It has been years since dievca has treated Master and herself to a new (and more durable) black play collar. Master happily approved of her plan. So, she’s started her search with:

LEATHER COLLAR IN BLACK (1.625″)

$75.00
Hand crafted in premium genuine leather, this simple and elegant leather collar design is both comfortable and durable.
1.625 inches (41mm) thick. Fits neck sizes up to 16 inches (41cm). Includes a retainer pin, but can be locked with a small padlock (sold separately).

Each collar is hand-made from premium quality double-back belting leather, and then lined with a padded, ultra-soft hand-bag leather. The edges are folded for maximum comfort and sewn with oversized nylon thread for superb durability. The retaining pin is designed to fit a small padlock (not included $18.00).

Matching Lead is $55.00

WWW.ETERNITYCOLLARS.COM

If you have a suggestion for a black play collar, dievca would love to hear about it!


Preparation

√ Waxxed
√ Exfoliated
√ Washed
√ Body Lotion
√ Deoderant
√ Hair Product
√ Air Dryed Curls
√ Nail Polish
√ Facial Cream
√ Cat Eyes
√ Bold Red Lips
Vivienne Westwood Heels
√ Master’s Collar

READY!


Be Careful!

But maybe you want that Black Cat to cross your path….hmmm?


Happy Friday the 13th!
May you have a very LUCKY day 🖤🖤🖤


It suits your body: Bodysuits (lingerie)

David Vasiljevic shoots Kasia Struss for the September 2010 issue of Numéro Tokyo.

David Vasiljevic shoots Kasia Struss for the September 2010 issue of Numéro Tokyo.

BODYSUIT, a leotard-like (see Leotard definition below) undergarment, usually skintight or formfitting. Can be another form of shapewear.

A bodysuit  is a one-piece form-fitting garment that covers the torso and the crotch. The style of a basic bodysuit is similar to a one-piece swimsuit and a leotard, though the materials may vary. A bodysuit, unlike a swimsuit or leotard, has snaps, hooks or velcro at the crotch.

teal-crushed-velvet-bodysuit-1990sA bodysuit may have sleeves and varying shoulder strap and collar styles. Bodysuits can be made from a number of fabrics; cotton, lace, nylon, etc. In general, textile bodysuits include expandable fiber such as spandex for a better fit to the shape of the body.

A bodysuit is normally worn with trousers or a skirt. The top, torso part may act as a top for the smooth line it gives or because it cannot become untucked from trousers or skirt. They may also be worn generally by women as underwear, activewear, or foundation garments. Unlike a leotard, a bodysuit is not usually considered a form of athletic wear.  The purpose of the opening at the crotch is entry into the piece and for a visit to the toilet.

NOTE:
There are also bodyshirts, loose-fitting garments that cover the torso, with sleeves in short to long lengths and crotch snaps. The difference is that they look like a shirt on the top part of the garment, and may have a different stretch fabric in the waist to the crotch area to make them fit better. (instead of using a “fight strap”? 😁)

HISTORY:
The bodysuit was a progression from the leotard. It was presented in the United States after 1950 by fashion designer Claire McCardell. The first recognized bodysuit was worn by Bettie Page in the 1950s, and was a trademark attire of the Playboy Bunnies from the 1960s, as well as of Wonder Woman in the animated series Super Friends plus, Lynda Carter, in the television series.

Azzedine Alaia and Donna Karan helped make the bodysuit a fashion item for both men and women in the 1980s. After a slowdown, it was resurrected as shaping underwear or lingerie, and in the 2010s it reappeared as a blouse bodysuit and classic turtleneck bodysuit – moving into full usage TODAY!

Check out the current Lingerie / Innerwear as Outerwear options from
Fleur du Mal:

 

LEOTARD:
A leotard is a unisex skin-tight one-piece garment that covers the torso but leaves the legs exposed. The garment was first made famous by the French acrobatic performer Jules Léotard (1838–1870). There are sleeveless, short-sleeved and long-sleeved leotards.
Leotards are worn by acrobats, gymnasts, dancers, figure skaters, athletes, actors, and circus performers both as practice garments and performance costumes. They are often worn together with ballet skirts on top and tights or sometimes bike shorts as underwear. As a casual garment, a leotard can be worn with a belt; it can also be worn under overalls or short skirts.
Leotards are entered through the neck (in contrast to bodysuits which have snaps at the crotch, allowing the garment to be pulled on over the head). Scoop-necked leotards have wide neck openings and are held in place by the elasticity of the garment. Others are crew necked or polo necked and close at the back of the neck with a zipper or snaps.

Rollerskating Leotards

Rollerskating in Leotards


Racing Along~

dievca’s ‘hood.
The one new subway stop that is relatively clean and empty in NYC.

She’ll be seeing this New York City Ballet piece, next week, at the recommendation of a friend.
Cheap seats, sitting high and by herself. If she waits to schedule with someone, it might not get done and she really trusts this friend when it comes to dance performances.

The Times Are Racing, Justin Peck – Ensemble

dievca finds it interesting how ballet companies are working to bring contemporary pieces to the masses via music, costumes and choreography, while Opera seems stagnant. (but, dievca is not an aficionado of opera.)

Speaking of costumes — they were designed by Opening Ceremony.  Yes, dievca has a couple of pieces.

Justine Clenquet x Opening Ceremony

Justine Clenquet x Opening Ceremony Joe Hoops

Opening Ceremony Turtleneck See-thru Bodysuit, black with purple


négligée (lingerie)

négligée is a light dressing gown. It is usually floor length, though it can be knee length as well.

The negligee or négligée, from the French: négligé, literally meaning “neglected”, known in French as déshabillé, is a form of see-through clothing for women consisting of a sheer usually long dressing gown. It is a form of nightgown intended for wear at night and in the bedroom. It was introduced in France in the 18th century, where it mimicked the heavy head-to-toe style of women’s day dresses of the time.

By the 1920s, the negligee began to resemble women’s satin single-layer evening dress of the period. The term “negligee” was used on a Royal Doulton run of ceramic figurines in 1927, showing women wearing what appears to be a one-piece knee-length silk or rayon slip, trimmed with lace.

 

Although the evening-dresses style of nightwear made moves towards the modern negligee style—translucent bodices, lace trimming, bows, exemplified in 1941 by a photo of Rita Hayworth in Life Magazine—it was only after World War II that nightwear changed from being primarily utilitarian to being primarily sensual or even erotic; the negligee emerged strongly as a form of lingerie.

Modern negligees are often much looser and made of sheer and diaphanous fabrics and trimmed with lace or other fine material, and bows. Multiple layers of fabric are often used. The modern negligee thus perhaps owes more to women’s fine bedjackets or bed-capes, and up-market slips than to the nightgown. It spread to a mass market, benefitting from the introduction of cheap synthetic fabrics such as nylon and its finer successors (silk). From the 1940s to the 1970s, the trend was for negligees to become shorter in length (e.g. the babydoll of the 1970s). Negligees made from the 1940s to the 1970s are now collectible vintage items.

dievca usually thinks of a négligée as a very light see-thru robe (dressing gown), but it looks like the definition can include what dievca defines as “night gowns”. In photos, Rita Hayworth had robes and gown style options.

BTW -who wouldn’t want her lingerie collection. Amazing!

Wikipedia, Merriam-Webster