Cruisin’

Cruising is distinguished from regular driving by the social and recreational nature of the activity, which is characterized by an impulsively random, often aimless course. A popular route (or “strip”) is often the focus of cruising. “Cruise nights” are evenings during which cars drive slowly.

dievca went to College in a mid-sized City and worked selling dance clothing and shoes her Junior/Senior year for extra cash.  The store was off the historical “Main Strip” where kids would cruise in their cars on Friday and Saturday nights.  She was amazed to see the activity continue in the mid-80’s, because she thought it was a 1960’s and a Southern thing.

Wrong.

The same feeling occurred, last night – watching a few of lowriders cruising in Albuquerque.  They joined the ranks of a couple of vintage cars and souped-up mufflers on pick-up trucks.  They ALL made dievca smile~

Apparently, New Mexico claims to be the Lowrider Capital of the World.
The town Espanola in particular:

Wedged between two national forests and split by the Rio Grande sits Española, New Mexico. With a population just over 10,000, and an economic relevance that peaked when the railroad rolled through in 1880, you wouldn’t expect much more than Southwestern small-town tourist fare here. All the more surprising, then, that it’s become the Lowrider Capital of the World.

It started small, 60 years ago. The lowrider scene had already taken root in Los Angeles, a new car culture born of rebellion. Its brash, flashy, low-and-slow mantra served as an act of defiance by Chicanos who had long been told to keep their heads down, work hard, and assimilate into the white American mainstream. Lowriders were an outward statement that they weren’t content to blend in. They had arrived, they had a culture all their own, and they wanted people to know it.

Showing off on the street is a surefire way to draw police attention, and lowriders were no exception. Hydraulic suspension, the defining feature of a modern lowrider, was invented in response to harassment from law enforcement. California authorities made it illegal for any part of a car’s bodywork to sit lower than the bottom of the wheel. With hydraulics, you could raise the car to dodge a ticket and slam it back down when the cops were gone.

That resonated in Española. The town, sometimes called “Little L.A.,” has deep ties to the Hispanic and Chicano communities of Southern California. Families that had been in New Mexico for generations would head west seeking opportunity and return with money and a taste of California culture. Lowriders were a natural fit for Española, a continuation of the artistic tendencies that had defined Northern New Mexico for hundreds of years.

Excepts from Road and Trackclick here for more and some great machines

 

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Thoughts on the 4th of July

Women dressed up in Washington, DC July 4 1919. GHI-Universal History Archive via Getty Images

Women dressed up in Washington, DC July 4 1919. GHI-Universal History Archive via Getty Images

The 4th of July parade was such a big deal in dievca’s hometown. People dressed up, bands played, Veterans marched.
Is it still like that in small towns?

NYC may have a parade…dievca is not sure. she’s never looked it up or gone to watch. What she really misses is the Beer and Bratwurst Tent that the Lions Club sponsored for the weekend – their bratwursts were pork.
(Is the corn knee-high by the 4th of July? If yes – its a good crop year)
In the evening of the 4th, you would sit almost under the fireworks offered at the local High School Soccer fields. It was social, yet – intimate. dievca felt like she was a part of the Earth and the Universe.

Something to ponder.

So, dievca’s hometown did host a parade and fireworks this year, but the Brat Tent is on hold until 2022…


You know…Europe is a little tired of Tourists.

There was an issue on the French news….about too many tourists on the beaches.

That’s a refrain echoing in a growing number of European cities. The neoclassical gems that once made up the grand tour have been stops on package tours since the 19th century. But it’s only over the past decade or so that the number of travelers to these and other must-see destinations risks subsuming the places. Around 87 million tourists visited France in 2017, breaking records; 58.3 million went to Italy; and even the tiny Netherlands received 17.9 million visitors. (Time Magazine)

dievca’s Dutch friend told her about how the tourists are really dangerous on the bicycles in Amsterdam and the older people are too scared to bike around the City and get out of their houses.

How much is too much? And how are people to live in the Cities they love?

dievca runs into this in NYC. she sighs and tries to remember that tourism brings a lot of $ to the City. It’s annoying though~ five people walking abreast, taking selfies, clogging the Subways and expecting you to be kind and pleased that they are spending time in NYC – all when you need to get the hell to work and are pissed that they are lollygagging around.

In France, dievca kept her mouth shut most of the time. Tried to speak her pathetic French and was very cognizant of the locals. she avoided the hot tourist areas and when she was there, she was polite – even when a Honfleur shopkeeper was exceptionally nasty immediately upon entry to a nougat shop. dievca’s friend, who’s French is superb — went after her. dievca just walked out — an 80 Euro loss to someone who was located in a very touristy spot and having a bad day. dievca felt bad — it was early August, just the beginning of the Holiday month in France. The Lady was going to have a tough month. (Menopause kicking in? maybe – it was that odd.)

A tough issue for Cities like Barcelona, Amsterdam, Paris, Palma, Venice, Dubrovnik, Copenhagen and more. And with Millennials wanting to travel:

Millennials will likely have more of an impact on travel and tourism than any other generational group, according to a new report from Resonance Consultancy. The report—the “Future of U.S. Millennial Travel”—studied the travel habits and preferences of Millennials, a generation that values experiences over material possessions.

It is going to be an issue for the future.