Tattoo You – Aubade Paris

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A new lease of life for tattoos

Etched into our skin for thousands of years, tattoos have become artistic as well as aesthetic. A phenomenon that has broken all the boundaries of fashion.

For a long time, tattoos conjured up the tribal images of ancient cultures and exotic peoples, with enormous symbols covering the arms, backs and torsos of Polynesian, Maori and Japanese people, for example. And rightly so: for centuries, tattoos represented a rite of passage, symbols of protection or a sign of belonging to a particular clan or tribe.

Until the trend took off again around 1990 to 2000. From the shower of tiny stars on the back of Rihanna’s neck to the giant words and patterns on David Beckham’s body, these permanent markings have become extremely fashionable. The Musée du Quai Branly in Paris hosted an exhibition on tattoos in 2015.

As a way to stand out from the crowd or express your personality, tattoos have become like a second skin. They can be proudly shown off, or reserved for only the most intimate views.

Tattoo Boxer Aubade


May Day – Sing a Song of Spring!

p-nadarpaul.jpgSing a song of May-time.
Sing a song of Spring.
Flowers are in their beauty.
Birds are on the wing.
May time, play time.
God has given us May time.
Thank Him for His gifts of love.
Sing a song of Spring.

Photo: Paul Nadar 1874-1939
Rue d’Anjou, Paris, France

The son of the Famous French photographer Felix Tournachon (Nadar). Paul began working at his father’s studio in 1874. He investigated the many possibilities of photography such as capturing views from hot air balloons. In 1890 he made a trip to Central Asia using George Eastman’s new flexible bromide film. The collaboration worked so well that Nadar became the representative for Kodak products in France. Both Paul and his father photographed many famous people of their time but Paul’s emphasis on those at the cutting edge of society strained their relationship. Paul not only produced portraits of celebrities of the stage, he hosted the first exhibition of Impressionist painters.

In the 1920’s a good number of real photo postcards were produced under the Nadar name, most of them of full nudes with some of them having hand coloring. But there is serious doubt to whether the cards of nudes were actually made from Nadar’s photographs. Another unknown publisher may have borrowed Nadar’s logo to enhance the prestige of these cards and make them more sellable.

A “Thank You” to metropostcard.com


Understanding a friend’s behavior – after years of friendship.

In France, there are several words for “to complain”: there’s se plaindre”, used for regular old complaining; there’s porter plainte”, for complaining more officially. And then there’s râler”complaining just for the fun of it. A curmudgeonly grumble.

Aha!

In France, a complaint is an appropriate – and frequent – conversation starter. “To Americans, saying something negative sounds like you’re closing the conversation”, in France, such comments are perceived as “a way to invite other people’s opinions”. North Americans, she said, are not as comfortable with confrontation – or with criticism – as the French are. Râler, then, “comes across as something that’s more intelligent than being too starry-eyed and optimistic about things”. (Julie Barlow – Canadian Journalist)

dievca’s friend is half-French, but it is a large half of her Life.  That consistent grumbling is an invitation to an intelligent conversation….and dievca has missed the boat a number of times. XOXO

BBC Article: Why the French Love to Complain

An additional note from dievca – when Americans hear a complaint, they think they need to fix the issue. Apparently, the “râler” creates no such obligation. Good to know!


A little italiàno travels well

So, dievca has been at a caffeine loss since Scandinavia.  The French coffee is not as strong.
dievca was forced to seek alternative coffee and espresso filled the bill.
Thank goodness for the Italians!
(and a heck of a lot of them are wandering Normandy and Brittany)