A final walk

Check out
A trip to the Zoo
A rinse at a beach shower
Red Eye Home

It’s been a lovely trip, but its nice to get back to Master.


Think on it…

windowsill-herb-garden-kit-supportive-wm_470x509

Sustainable Seed Company’s Window Herb Garden Kit $34.99

dievca is trying to figure out if she should to replant her hydroponic Mason Jar Garden or just go with this Window Herb Kit. Maybe both….the trick is that her large windows generate a lot of heat. Are you starting to plant a garden?


Replacing ‘Something of Use’ after 29 years

In a Past Life, dievca received a set of melamine mixing bowls from Crate and Barrel as a gift.

The bowls have been through multiple moves, lived in Europe, have been dropped, washed, held salads and made cookies numerous times.  Like everything else, 29 years of weekly wear has taken a toll.  The pouring spouts are chipped, the rubber holders on the bottom are deteriorating and, yet, dievca is holding on to them.

Why?  The bowl portion itself has not cracked and Melamine is categorized under Class #7 on the list of Plastic Resin Codes. This means that it is a widely used plastic that does not fit into the more commonly used #1-6 classifications and should not be thrown in your recycling bin. Melamine cannot be melted for recycling like other plastics.

The bowls are a modern classic. Created by Danish designers – Rosti in 1954, the Margrethe bowl was produced and named after then Princess Margrethe, the current queen of Denmark. The easy-care melamine mixing bowls have ergonomic handles, pouring spouts and a non-skid ring at the bottom.

dievca looked up the bowls on the Crate and Barrel website and they are still listed for sale.  In fact, they now come with lids – that wasn’t available the first time around. The price? $39.95

The question is….can dievca throw away the still usable bowls and all the memories attached to them.

We’ll see.

Rosti Melamine MargretheS3BowlsWLidsWhite


Zen on Espresso Day!

The word espresso (/ɛˈsprɛsoʊ/; Italian pronunciation: [eˈsprɛsso]) in Italian means ‘quick in time.’ Before the advent of the espresso machine, espresso was simply a coffee expressly made for the person ordering it. It was also made with recently roasted and freshly ground beans. The cup was brewed shortly before serving. In the late 1800s, this practice was commonplace in cafés and restaurants.

Does anyone else find this gif mesmerizing?
dievca just went into a trance~
Happy Espresso Day!