Greenleaf Classics

Paperback Sex Novels –
what Kindle manages to hide.

The Artwork is Classic.

dievca is not too sure about the storylines.  If you are humored here is the link to the website which has documented these …. lost classics.


Hot Times via Weegee

As for Coney Island on weekends, block after block of beach was so jammed with people that it was barely possible to find a space to sit or to put down your book or your hot dog.

As dievca changed her calendar, she stared at the WeeGee Coney Island Photo – amazed and appalled. Too hot, too many people. This after she was lying sprawled on the sofa eating chilled watermelon in the City’s heat and humidity. Now, in the bedroom, the AC is turned on.

People on West 110th Street, where I lived, were a little too bourgeois to sit out on their fire escapes, but around the corner on 111th and farther uptown mattresses were put out as night fell, and whole families lay on those iron balconies in their underwear.

Even through the nights, the pall of heat never broke. With a couple of other kids, I would go across 110th to the Park and walk among the hundreds of people, singles and families, who slept on the grass, next to their big alarm clocks, which set up a mild cacophony of the seconds passing, one clock’s ticks syncopating with another’s. Babies cried in the darkness, men’s deep voices murmured, and a woman let out an occasional high laugh beside the lake. I can recall only white people spread out on the grass; Harlem began above 116th Street then.

(The New Yorker“Before Air-Conditioning” by Arthur Miller, June 22, 1998, p. 144)

Weegee was the pseudonym of Arthur Fellig, a photographer and photojournalist, known for his stark black and white street photography.

A "Thank You" to Aphelis.net and 

Learning about one’s self


Hmmm…dievca falls into this group…

Undergraduate and graduate women (N = 245) from a large midwestern university volunteered to complete nine self‐report scales and inventories. Thirty‐seven percent of the sample reported they had experienced nocturnal orgasm, and 30% reported having had the experience in the past year. The predictors accounted for a statistically significant amount of variation in each of the dependent variables: 33% of “ever experienced nocturnal orgasm,” 44% of “experienced nocturnal orgasm in the past year,” and 27% in the case of “frequency of nocturnal orgasm in the past year.” Positive attitudes toward and knowledge of nocturnal orgasms, sexual liberalism, and waking sexually excited from sleep (without experiencing orgasm) were the most important predictors of nocturnal orgasm experience.

-The Journal of Sex Research, Volume 22, 1986 – Issue 4. Barbara L. Wells


Sharing the giving of Thanks in NYC

The Mickey Mouse balloon debuted at the 1934 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade

dievca has a lot to be Thankful for and she will take a moment today to think on that and she is sure a number of other people will be doing the same thing across the USA. Maybe the World would like to join in for a moment of Thanks (except for Canada…they already had their Thanksgiving~).

And if not, maybe you might be interested in the History of the NYC Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade which (like many USA traditions)….started as an advertising gimmick:

Macy’s Day Parade: The Beginnings

The first-ever Macy’s Day Parade actually took place on Christmas of 1924. Macy’s employees dressed as clowns, cowboys, and other fun costumes, and traveled with Central Park zoo animals and creative floats a lengthy six miles from Herald Square to Harlem in Manhattan.

NYC's Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade: The Humpty Dumpty Float- 1926

NYC’s Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade: The Humpty Dumpty Float- 1926

The parade was meant to draw attention to the Macy’s store in NYC, and the gimmick worked – more than 250,000 people attended the inaugural Macy’s Day Parade. It was decided that this NYC parade would become an annual NY event in Manhattan.

In 1927, Felix the Cat became the first giant balloon to ever take part in the Macy’s Day Parade. In 1928, Felix was inflated with helium, and without a plan to deflate this massive balloon, NYC parade organizers simply let Felix fly off into the sky. Unfortunately, he popped soon afterwards.

The Macy’s Day Parade continued to let the balloons fly off in following years, only these balloons would have a return address written on them, and whoever found the balloon could return the balloon for a prize from Macy’s. However, the results of this experiment weren’t exactly successful….

Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade Continues to Grow

The Eddie Cantor Balloon in the 1940 Thanksgiving Day Parade New York

The Eddie Cantor Balloon in the 1940 Thanksgiving Day Parade New York

Despite the Great Depression, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade continued to grow through the 1930’s. The first national radio broadcast of the Macy’s Parade Thanksgiving took place in 1932. Two years later, Disney got in on the giant balloon fun, introducing the Mickey Mouse balloon in 1934. By then, more than one million people were attending this popular parade in NYC, and those fortunate enough to own a TV could see the broadcast on NBC starting in 1939.

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York was temporarily suspended from 1942- 1944 for World War II. In an effort to help America’s cause, the rubber used to make the Macy’s Day Parade floats were donated to the American military. More than two million people attended the 1945 Macy’s Day Parade, and this popular New York City event has continued to grow ever since.

Today, more than 8,000 people take part in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade each year, and it takes another 4,000 dedicated volunteers to put together this NYC Thanksgiving celebration. Both NBC and CBS broadcast the New York City parade nationwide, and this NYC event still attracts high-profile musicians and the most talented Broadway performers.

Fun Facts about the NYC Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

Did you know…

Like today, children then also loved the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade

Like today, children then also loved the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade

  • The inaugural Macy’s Day Parade took place on Christmas, 1924.
  • Over 250,000 people attended the first Macy’s Day Parade in NYC.
  • In 1927, Felix the Cat became the first giant balloon featured at the Macy’s Day Parade.
  • The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade New York was first broadcast on the radio in 1932.
  • One million people attended the 1933 Thanksgiving Day Parade in NYC.
  • In 1934, Mickey Mouse made his giant balloon debut at this famous New York City parade.
  • The Macy’s Day Parade floats were pulled by horses until 1939.
  • 1939 was also the first year NBC broadcast the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. NBC continues to be the official broadcast station of the Macy’s Parade, though CBS also carries the parade unofficially. 50 million viewers tune in to this New York parade each year.
  • Because of Word War II, there was no Macy’s Day Parade from 1942-1944. During that time, the rubber and helium originally meant to blow up the famous Macy’s balloons were donated to the American military.
  • The 1945 Macy’s Day Parade surpassed 2 million people in attendance.
  • Six days after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade went ahead as scheduled in hopes of raising the national spirit.
  • Snoopy – the Peanuts character created by Charles Schultz – holds the distinction of having the most Thanksgiving Day NYC Parade floats, with six different balloons since 1968.
  • Because of heavy rain, the 1971 Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade was forced to ground all giant balloons, making it the first Macy’s Parade without balloons since 1926.

A dachsund parade balloon in Times Square - 1950's

A dachsund parade balloon in Times Square – 1950s

  • Today’s Macy’s Day Parade features over a dozen giant balloons, nearly 30 parade floats, 1,500 dancers and cheerleaders, more than 750 clowns, several marching bands from around the country, and over 8,000 participants in all!
  • The giant balloon inflation is open to the public, and takes place from 3pm-10pm the evening before Thanksgiving on 77th and 81st streets between Central Park West and Columbus Ave.
  • 4,000 volunteers take the time each year to put on this NYC Thanksgiving celebration.
  • The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade route is 2.65 miles long.
  • 3.5 million people attend the Macy’s Day Parade each year.
  • The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade is the second-oldest in the country, behind the 6ABC Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in Philadelphia.

(Thank you to NYC Tourist for the compilation of the history, modifications made by dievca)


Storybook

dievca’s view

Pieces of Bayeux

The Bayeux Tapestry; French: Tapisserie de Bayeux [tapisʁi də bajø] or La telle du conquest; Latin: Tapete Baiocense) is an embroidered cloth nearly 70 metres (230 ft) long and 50 centimetres (20 in) tall, which depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England about William, Duke of Normandy, and Harold, Earl of Wessex, later King of England, and culminating in the Battle of Hastings. It is thought to date to the 11th century, within a few years after the battle. It tells the story from the point of view of the conquering Normans.

According to Sylvette Lemagnen, conservator of the tapestry, in her 2005 book La Tapisserie de Bayeux:

The Bayeux tapestry is one of the supreme achievements of the Norman Romanesque …. Its survival almost intact over nine centuries is little short of miraculous … Its exceptional length, the harmony and freshness of its colours, its exquisite workmanship, and the genius of its guiding spirit combine to make it endlessly fascinating.

The designs on the Bayeux Tapestry are embroidered and not woven, so that it is not technically a tapestry.[5] Nevertheless, it has always been referred to as a tapestry until recent years when the name “Bayeux Embroidery” has gained ground among certain art historians. The tapestry may be seen as a perfect example of secular Norman art.

During the Second World War, Bayeux was the first city of the Battle of Normandy to be liberated, and on 16 June 1944 General Charles de Gaulle made the first of two major speeches in Bayeux where he made clear that France sided with the Allies. The buildings in Bayeux were virtually untouched during the Battle of Normandy, the German forces being fully involved in defending Caen from the Allies.

Thank you to wiki and Photos: dievca 08/2018

Finding a Beach: Operation Jubilee

The Dieppe Raid was an Allied assault on the German-occupied port of Dieppe, France on 19 August 1942, during the Second World War. The main assault lasted less than six hours until strong German defenses and mounting Allied losses forced its commanders to call a retreat.

Over 6,000 infantrymen, predominantly Canadian, were supported by The Calgary Regiment of the 1st Canadian Tank Brigade and a strong force of Royal Navy and smaller Royal Air Force landing contingents. It involved 5,000 Canadians, 1,000 British troops, and 50 United States Army Rangers.

The Allied air operations supporting Operation Jubilee resulted in some of the fiercest air battles since 1940.

And now, Sainte-Marguerite-sur-Mer:


Drop ‘yer Drawers (lingerie)

A drawing of cancan dancers among the crowd at the MOULIN ROUGE music-hall in Paris in the late XIXth century. Was the Gentleman peering through an opening in the drawers?

Drawers, or Pantalettes,  are a pant-like garment worn during the 19th century for modesty and warmth. They could be one-piece or two separate garments, one for each leg, attached at the waist with buttons or laces. The crotch was left open for hygiene reasons. They were most often of white linen fabric and could be decorated with tucks, lace, cutwork or broderie anglaise.


The split in the crotch of the drawers is convenient for going to the bathroom when you cannot take the drawers down under the heavy layers of skirt or a hoop. But like wearing Spanx tights or shapers — using the opening….it seems…messy.

Did the split in drawers make the Moulin Rouge shows more risqué than dievca ever knew? That high kick could be unintentionally revealing.

BTW – Spanx makes a modern version of drawers:

And, again, dievca has always wondered how you go to the bathroom without soaking the Spanx. In asking the question, she ran into a solution offered by the DailyMail.

Yes, for those of you who are very precise – there is a second definition of “Drawers” as in the furniture sense, Lingerie Drawers:

A semainier is a chest of drawers, usually tall and thin, intended for storing linen and lingerie. … Originating in 18th-century France, semainier has come to mean any seven-drawer chest these days but the term is sometimes erroneously applied to tall thin lingerie chests with only six drawers.