Sunday Brunch on the roof.

Melissa Odabash Alicia Pink Crochet Tunic

Emily Wiser Initial Necklace from Master

Chan Luu Peacock Pearl Mix Barrette ShopBop

David Yurman Petite Tahitian Ring

Ancient Greek Sandals Zenobia brown natural

Omo Norma Kamali Cat Eye Sunglasses

Nannacay Cotio Straw Bag Multi


Coffee on the Upper Eastside


dievca took a friend to an early morning outpatient medical procedure. One is not allowed to sit in the waiting room for the pick-up, so dievca wandered down to the East River to enjoy her coffee. An excellent choice.

Note: dievca brought her own coffee in an amazing Japanese brand ZOJIRUSHI thermos that a friend gifted to her.  

Photos: dievca UES 07/2020

Sturgeon Full Moon and an Optical Effect

The “Buck Moon” rises behind Lower Manhattan and One World Trade Center in New York City on July 5, 2020 as seen from Kearny, New Jersey. (Photo by Gary Hershorn/Getty Images)

The Full Sturgeon Moon

August’s full Moon will appear this evening of Sunday, August 2, before reaching peak illumination at 11:59 A.M. Eastern Time on Monday, August 3. On either August 2nd or 3rd, look toward the southeast after sunset to catch a glimpse of the Sturgeon Moon rising, weather permitting!

August’s full Moon will hang relatively low in the night sky, which makes it look larger due to perspective (Ebbinghaus Illusion). Why is the Moon hanging lower? A full Moon is opposite the Sun, which as we all know, is higher in the sky during summer. So the full Moon runs lower.


The Ebbinghaus illusion is one optical effect that might help explain the moon illusion. In this illustration, the green circles are exactly the same size, but the ones on the right appear larger than those on the left.green


This lapsed Catholic wonders~

Photo: dievca E. 90th Street NYC

Is there such a thing as an “Our Lady of Bad Counsel”?

A lapsed Catholic is a baptized Catholic who is non-practicing.
Such a person may still identify as a Catholic and remains a Catholic according to canon law.
Wikipedia


Roadside Farm stand – Something of Use – NYC style

Photo: dievca E. 93rd St

dievca remembers stopping by farm stands in the Midwestern Summers to buy fresh produce. There was even a place that dievca’s Mother found to dig up and buy mushrooms – a dark, musty space with soil.
As she was driving to the Delaware River dievca spotted similar stands along the road in New Jersey, she forgot to stop on her way back to NYC.

The NYC farm stands are not as good as the local ones, but they offer a reminder and convenient option to eat healthily.
Something of Use!


Hot in the City : Living in the (sub) Tropics?!?!?

Hot in the City : Chelo Alonso Cuban Dancer

New York City — formerly a humid continental climate — is now within the humid subtropical climate zone. The city has met the National Climate Assessment’s requirements to classify as humid subtropical for the past five years.
Climate of New York (state) - Wikipedia

What do those requirements entail?

  • Temperatures have averaged above 72 degrees in the summer
  • Higher than 27 degrees in the winter.
    During the first three months of this year, the average temperature in Central Park was over 42 degrees Fahrenheit, the director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Northeast Regional Climate Center.

Newer climate maps place NYC inside of the subtropical zone and instead of the humid continental warm summer climate zones similar to Pittsburgh and Chicago.  This makes sense when you look at vegetation and plant hardiness zone maps. NYC’s native birch and sugar maple trees are NOT flourishing in the heat while plants and trees that have historically thrived in Southeast Asia and South America are loving the weather.

The main culprit is assumed to be climate change. Climate zones around the world are shifting at an alarming rate. dievca expects her steaming concrete jungle to continue to get warmer. Per one study’s estimation, by 2050, the city could be as hot as Alabama. But who knows what will happen after COVID-19.

Time to treat NYC like a seasonal beach resort!

LES Hotel Indigo: Mr. Purple rooftop pool and bar.


Reaping the benefits of a Quarantine

Have you gained anything positive from the Quarantine?

We know the bad news:
People have died. People have been very ill, lost jobs, been furloughed.
Businesses closed, economies collapsing.

Loneliness. Depression.

Has anything positive happened?
CO2 emissions dropped.
Wildlife came back to heavily used and populated spaces. One can hear the birds chirping at 4:30 am in NYC.
Some businesses which were on the verge of collapse received a reprieve with Federal Aid or were able to file for bankruptcy in a less messy manner.
In NYC, Animal Shelters had most of their animals adopted.
Some Family and Friends grew closer than they ever expected.

dievca’s body has been healing.
Yes, there are age issues and lurking injuries that won’t disappear, but their impact has lessened – immensely.
dievca has been able to assess, have the time to fix and strengthen her body.
The time in quarantine has been a godsend to dievca and she feels a bit guilty about it. Catholic guilt.

Well – with dievca’s healing – she’s dusted off her road bike and has started cycling Central Park with Master. 

Joyce Barry Australian Cyclist

dievca’s bike was in storage, but the other ‘bits and bobs’ had to be bought
(click photos for brands):

If you want to know why dievca bought certain items – just ask.


How to beat the heat in NYC – old school

Mayor Hylan turning on the water for the first shower, July 6, 1921. West 47th Street near 8th Avenue, New York City. Photo by International Newsreel.

Enjoying the Croton Surf Under the Fire Department Sprinkler on 85th Street Near Lexington Avenue, August 17, 1920. Fire Department erects sprinkler for kiddies at 85th Street & Lexington Avenue, NYC. Kids enjoy bathing during hot weather. Photo by International Newsreel.

Kids in New York City splash around in a street flooded by fire hydrants, circa 1957. Keystone/Getty Images

Play Street and street shower alongside the Queensboro Bridge, June 22, 1934. Department of Bridges, Plant & Structures Collection, NYC Municipal Archives.

Denis P. Gorman Memorial Playground, Jackson Heights, Queens: Opening ceremonies, children grabbing for melon, August 11, 1934. Department of Parks & Recreation Collection, NYC Municipal Archives.

Kids in Harlem, New York City, cool off in front of a fire hydrant, circa 1966. Harry Benson Getty Images

dievca is ready to run under a fire hydrant sprinkle shower if the FDNY would oblige…


1st foray as a human in the heat

FORAY

noun

2: an initial and often tentative attempt to do something in a new or different field or area of activity,
A brief excursion or attempt especially outside one’s accustomed sphere.

dievca decided to look like a human rather than a slouch when making a foray to the Eastside. she figured out a way to beat the heat, too:

Loup Charmant Dayo Cotton Dress

Jack Gomme Light Lami Cerise

Boss Orange Olive leather flip flops

Elizabeth and James Horatio Sun Glasses

Ippolita Cherish 18-karat gold ring

Melissa Joy Manning Earrings

Rebecca Minkoff Chevron Stacking Rings

Woldford Nude Tulle Bra

Wolford Nude Tulle Panties

Zazzle red orange turquoise blue Indian floral paisley cloth face mask


What Macy’s is doing with their Fireworks~

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Getting the Party Started! (a slideshow)

dievca had the unexpected pleasure of looking out of her window to see two Macy’s barges offering a personal Fireworks display. she and Master had a conversation about the fireworks just that afternoon – Master thought they would cancel it all. dievca thought that the fireworks needed to be used and wasn’t sure of a solution.

Apparently, the Macy’s barges will be offering fireworks around the city along the Hudson and East Rivers (Harlem River?) in smaller and more personal displays. An absolutely lovely and elegant solution for limiting the crowds, yet still bringing Joy to NYC.

Photos: dievca Hudson River 06/2020

You can’t cancel PRIDE – it’s in you.

The NYC Gay Pride March scheduled for June 28, 2020, was canceled due to COVID-19.  The march was inaugurated on June 28, 1970 – it would have been the 50th Year.  There will be virtual celebrations and WABC in New York will be broadcasting NYC Pride programming the month of June.

“We are a community that thrives when we are united,” added Correa. “We may not fill the streets of New York City this year, but LGBTQIA+ people carry pride with them all year long.
I have no doubt that we will be together again soon.”
~ David A. Correa, Interim Executive Director Heritage of Pride

dievca has found her dress for this year’s celebration:

Banana Republic Gay Pride Dress $129.99 (click photo to buy)


moist with a hint of the ocean

Photo: dievca NYC Hudson River 06/2020

The sun is peeking up to reveal a world cocooned by humidity.
Moist air smells of the ocean, a river glistens like glass.
Suspended motion

broken by the cry of a seagull, the honk of a car horn

 


A chance for coffee in the City…


NYC starts Phase Two.


Playing Detective

(click photo for purchase $69.99)

So….everyone at work had tremendous sicks around the February timeframe, dievca included.
Weird sick
For dievca it was brutal headaches and exhaustion, others it was hacking coughs and exhaustion.

One co-worker recently got tested for the COVID-19 antibodies and they tested positive.
They and their family had gotten sick during the quarantine – bad. Their upstairs neighbor passed away. (duplex)

dievca is getting tested today for the antibodies out of curiosity.
Positive (+) result = she can confirm that the virus came from work. she hasn’t been sick in quarantine.
Negative (-) result = her coworker got the virus somewhere in Queens.

Its interesting being able to follow the trail.


Let’s take a drive


Out of the City
Up the Interstate
No panties to hold the wet

A place to park
Private and green
Somewhere to pet and suck

Stockings remain
Climax on the hood
The perfect Sunday drive


Mists in the Silence

New York, New York, 1955©Elliott Erwitt / Magnum Photos

It’s a misty morning here in NYC.
That and the silence of the relatively empty city
make for strange bedfellows
A surreal and beautiful moment

I am really going to miss the silence


Find the Sun and avoiding ‘scolds’

 

Several groups of researchers from different countries have found that the sickest patients often have the lowest levels of vitamin D and that countries with higher death rates had larger numbers of people with vitamin D deficiency than countries with lower death rates.

Note: The early research is not yet peer-reviewed, and other experts say the scientific proof is lacking that vitamin D could prevent COVID-19 or make the infection milder.

dievca is getting her Vitamin D early and away from as many humans as possible for the following reason:

scold

/skōld
verb
remonstrate with or rebuke (someone) angrily.

noun ARCHAIC•US
a person, in particular a woman, who nags or grumbles constantly.

Two women in full PPE suits and masks, power-walking in the middle of the road at Central Park scold the biker (15 feet away) for not wearing a mask.

Warning – the scolds are out, do not respond, and move away quickly. It could turn dangerous in more ways than one.

Photos: dievca, Hudson River NYC 05/2020

Good Advice from the Fortune Cookie

Photo: dievca fortune from cookie 05/2020

dievca had to run out to a smaller town in New Jersey for work.
BTW, groceries are cheaper.
And two Chinese Food Restaurants were open for delivery/pick-up.
(there are none open by dievca in NYC)

The monosodium glutamate (MSG) might kill you but
the taste of change and fortune is coming in a timely manner.

How are you holding up?

 

Positive Attitude Improves Your Mental Health

Approximately one in five Americans suffers from a mental health issue like anxiety or depression at any given time. While a positive outlook can’t prevent all mental health conditions, it can reduce your risk of developing depression and anxiety.


The Smell of Spring

Photo: dievca Crabapple blossoms Hudson River Path 04/2020

Pink, small, and punctual,
Aromatic, low,
Covert in April,
Candid in May,

Dear to the moss,
Known by the knoll,
Next to the robin
In every human soul.

Bold little beauty,
Bedecked with thee,
Nature forswears
Antiquity.

~Emily Dickinson


misty morning dreaming

All the long day the vapours played
At blindfold in the city streets,
Their elfin fingers caught and stayed
The sunbeams, as they wound their sheets
Into a filmy barricade
‘Twixt earth and where the sunlight beats.

A vagrant band of mischiefs these,
With wings of grey and cobweb gown;
They live along the edge of seas,
And creeping out on foot of down,
They chase and frolic, frisk and tease
At blind-man’s buff with all the town.

And when at eventide the sun
Breaks with a glory through their grey,
The vapour-fairies, one by one,
Outspread their wings and float away
In clouds of colouring, that run
Wine-like along the rim of day.

Athwart the beauty and the breast
Of purpling airs they twirl and twist,
Then float away to some far rest,
Leaving the skies all colour-kiss’t–
A glorious and a golden West
That greets the Lifting of the Mist.

The Lifting Of The Mist – Poem by Emily Pauline Johnson

Photo: NYC East River View

April Showers in COVID-19 NYC

Seen on the way:

  • One sad male young adult in cotton shorts and t-shirt soaked
  • One fit female runner in matching bra and leggings with pink Beat headphones
  • One millennial dog owner with a Husky mix the female runner kept admiring
  • Four soaked Navy Corpsmen in shorts and masks running back to the USNS Comfort
  • One dievca always prepared in a huge raincoat.

Vetements Libra Raincoat

Photos: dievca Hudson River 04/2020

Take a breath, savor the day, know you live.

Photo: dievca – Sunset on the Hudson 04/2020

If I can put one touch of rosy sunset into the life of any man or woman, I shall feel that I have worked with God.

~Gilbert K. Chesterton


Stop and smell the flowers – update.


A pretty sight, right? The pink flowers match the lingerie from yesterday. dievca didn’t get a photo of the flowers before the post. Here’s the order of activities:

  1. A two-CD mix made for dievca’s Mother took a full day to source and collect songs, then find a burner for the CD’s. Her Dad is failing badly, so she asked the Caregivers to play the music from “Carmen Jones” and “Das Boot” via YouTube on the tablet for expedience. The CD’s are for the stereo – both of dievca’s parents are going deaf.
  2. The next day after work, dievca took a 1.5-hour walk around the City – to get out of the apartment. The wind was brutal-you can see the birds fighting the chop on the Hudson River. she found one place to walk up to buy coffee – it was a treat tasting a different flavor than her coffee.
  3. The 3rd day, dievca biked up the Hudson River Park trail in the rain to get to Master. Master’s windows offered an elegant view of two Magnolia trees in bloom.
    And she shared dinner and wine with Master after a little D/s play.

If dievca’s Dad dies – she won’t be able to get to her mother for the funeral. There is a two-week quarantine for New Yorkers heading out of State via air travel. dievca hasn’t been sick, but she would prefer to be careful. Understandably, as dievca’s Mom wouldn’t make it through a bout of COVID-19 under Hospice care.

Photos: dievca 04/2020 NYC - graphic from a good friend.

What do the numbers look like?

Local gyms are offering free online classes, Peloton is offering a free 90-day subscription (including classes that don’t need bike), people are doing classes via youtube, etc. dievca sees her neighbors working out in their apartments (Remember, she lives in a fishbowl). she’s been doing personal workouts and online workouts, too.

So…how many weekend warriors are getting injured?
Where do they go if the injury is more severe and cannot be taken care of at a clinic?
The hospitals are overwhelmed with COVID-19.

Maybe at the USNS Comfort:

The Comfort’s 1,000 beds and 12 operating rooms will largely be used for non-coronavirus patients, freeing up much-needed space at the city’s overtaxed hospitals. The ship is typically used to support military campaigns and humanitarian crises abroad, along with earthquake and hurricane relief. Most recently, it was deployed to Latin America, helping countries with inadequate health care systems. It was last stationed in New York City after the 9/11 terrorist attacks where it helped treat hundreds of first responders.
~ the Verge

During the conversation dievca had with the Millenials who gave blood there was a discussion about how they were so astounded at the amount of time, effort and clean-up involved with cooking at home.😳 Maybe the USNS Comfort will be dealing with kitchen knife incidents or burn issues for these newly minted cooks.

What are the numbers?

At least no one is really driving the city – so auto accident numbers should be down.


Searching for extras and the ways to share


dievca spent the day calling Midwestern small town ACE hardware stores and Farm/Fleet stores, she contacted both her Alma Maters Nursing and Biology programs, work maintenance group and friends. Searching for masks.

Not the ones people are so generously sewing. The heavier duty ones that can be used for a swamped ER in a local hospital. A personal friend who runs the ER has severe asthma – reusing a mask is unsafe.

Everyone dievca called/emailed were very kind in replying and searching their facilities or stores. The Nursing departments and Biology departments already donated. Work needed their masks. The ACE hardware stores were out but took their time to look properly. Farm/Fleet came through with a small amount. Better than nothing and dievca had the time to search. she’s still trying to figure out how to get in touch with the closed NYC nail salons.

dievca was doing this for a specific individual and could have them shipped directly.

But, if you have some spare masks or other supplies and are willing to share, here are suggestions where to share the items safely: https://thecity.nyc/2020/03/how-can-i-donate-supplies-to-new-york-hospitals-in-need.html


~Give Blood~

Severe Blood Shortage, Donors Urgently Needed
Right now, eligible and healthy donors are strongly urged to make an appointment to provide lifesaving blood products to patients. Please give now.

About blood:

      • Blood makes up around 7% of the weight of a human body.
      • Blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
      • These blood cells float in a yellow liquid called blood plasma. Blood plasma is made up of 90% water and also contains various nutrients, electrolytes, gases, proteins, glucose, and hormones.
      • Blood plasma can be separated from the cells by spinning the blood in a centrifuge until the cells collect at the bottom of the tube.
      • Red blood cells carry oxygen around the body. They contain a protein called hemoglobin. Hemoglobin contains iron which combines with oxygen to give hemoglobin and our blood, a red color.
      • Red blood cells develop in the bone marrow and circulate in the body for around 120 days.
      • White blood cells are an important part of the body’s immune system. They defend against certain bacteria, viruses, cancer cells, infectious diseases, and other unwanted materials.
      • Platelets help blood clot in order to limit bleeding when your skin is cut. Blood clots can occasionally have negative effects if they form in blood vessels going to the brain they can cause a stroke while clotting in a blood vessel going to the heart can lead to a heart attack.
      • As well as delivering important substances to our cells, blood also helps take away unwanted waste products.
      • Grouping human blood types can be a difficult process and there are currently around 30 recognized blood types (or blood groups). You might be familiar with the more simplified “ABO” system which categorizes blood types under O, A, B and AB.
      • The most common blood type in the United States is O Positive (39% of the population), while the least common blood type is AB negative with only (0.5% of the population). The most common blood type in Japan is A positive.

Needs:

        • Patients in the United States use approximately 32,000 pints of blood every day.
        • Nearly 7,000 units of platelets and 10,000 units of plasma are needed daily in the U.S.
        • Nearly 21 million blood components are transfused each year in the U.S.
        • The average red blood cell transfusion is approximately 3 units.
        • The blood type most often requested by hospitals is type O.
        • Sickle cell disease affects 90,000 to 100,000 people in the U.S. About 1,000 babies are born with the disease each year. Sickle cell patients can require blood transfusions throughout their lives.
        • According to the American Cancer Society, more than 1.8 million people are expected to be diagnosed with cancer in 2020. Many of them will need blood, sometimes daily, during their chemotherapy treatment.
        • A single-car accident victim can require as many as 100 units of blood.

Supply:

  • Each year, an estimated 6.8 million people in the U.S. donate blood.
  • 13.6 million whole blood and red blood cells are collected in the U.S. in a year.
  • About 45% of people in the U.S. have Group O (positive or negative) blood; the proportion is higher among Hispanics (57%) and African Americans (51%).
  • Type O negative red cells can be given to patients of all blood types. Because only 7% of people in the U.S. are type O negative, it’s always in great demand and often in short supply.
  • Type AB positive plasma can be transfused to patients of all blood types. Since only 3% of people in the U.S. have AB positive blood, this plasma is usually in short supply.
  • Red blood cells must be used within 42 days (or less).
  • Platelets must be used within just 5 days.


Experience:
Actually, dievca’s blood is B- not coffee as she expected. Not the most useful blood type, but maybe it will help.
The Port Authority Blood Donation Center is in operation. People are scheduled on a sliding system. The donors were all-male when she arrived and finished all-female when she left. 80% Millenial 20% Generation X. The experience offered a nice chat over snacks and juice, 6 feet apart.

Again, please consider donating if you can.


Empty Nest


And the City echoes in its Silence

Photos: dievca Hudson Yards 'the vessel' 5pm on a Friday 03/2020

And the tourists are gone!

OK, there are a few tourists still lurking about…

Look tourists in NYC are tolerated because they bring money to the City,
but they are not well-liked.
It’s pure joy to wander around a quiet town,
doing things that you have avoided for 15+ years
because of tourists.

Here is dievca’s 1st Staten Island Ferry Trip:

Photos: dievca Staten Island Ferry NYC 03/2020

COVID-19 navigating the City

The subways are empty but if a train is full, everyone gives one another the beady-eye.
Haven’t seen any sick people on the go.
The streets are young.
Many people working from home.
Some people put on furlough.
Some empty shelves in the grocery stores, but toilet paper is available.
Restaurants in action about 75% full.
Quiet.


NYC what is in a name?

Graphic by Lindsy Spinks (click graphic for article)

Where the Names Came From:

MANHATTAN

  • San Juan Hill
    The site in Cuba of a battle in the Spanish-American War.
  • Striker’s Bay
    The farm of the Strycker family, early Dutch settlers.
  • Tenderloin District
    Bribes paid to police in this red-light area allowed them to enjoy “tenderloin” steak.
  • Carmansville
    Named for Richard Carman, a box-maker and landowner.
  • Mackarelville
    Fish vendors once worked along Avenue A.
  • Five Points
    Five roads met in this spot once known for crime.
  • Dry Dock District
    For the shipbuilding along the East River.
  • Jones Wood
    An area first settled by merchant John Jones.

BROOKLYN

  • Carroll Gardens
    A nod to Charles Carroll, who signed the Declaration of Independence.
  • Mill Basin
    Once home to a tide mill.
  • Crown Heights
    From “Crow Hill,” a nickname for a 19th-century prison.
  • Brownsville
    Where Charles S. Brown turned farms into apartment buildings.
  • Vinegar Hill
    In honor of a 1798 battle between the Irish and British.
  • Bushwick
    An Anglicized version of “Bos Wyck,” Dutch for “wooded district.”
  • Red Hook
    “Roode Hoek” is Dutch for red corner.
  • Sheepshead Bay
    For a striped fish that was once common.

QUEENS

  • Rego Park
    A portmanteau of “Real Good Construction Company.”
  • Jamaica
    From “Yamecah,” Algonquin for “beaver.”
  • Murray Hill
    The Murray family of Manhattan was influential in Queens too.
  • Ozone Park
    As in “fresh air,” not “ozone layer.”
  • Astoria
    For John Jacob Astor.

THE BRONX

  • Mott Haven
    Jordan L. Mott established a foundry here.
  • Little Yemen
    The Bronx’s newest neighborhood.
  • Allerton
    Bronxwood wasn’t sticking, so residents chose Allerton.
  • Woodstock
    The title of an 1826 novel about an English castle.

STATEN ISLAND

  • Bulls Head
    For a tavern from the American Revolution.
  • Arrochar
    For the ancestral Scottish home of William W. MacFarland.
  • Graniteville
    For a rock quarry.

A “Thank You” to The New York Times

And now the more practical view of Manhattan names:

Manhattan is split into “districts”, some of which have become synonymous with geographic & neighborhood vernacular such as the Flatiron District, The Meatpacking District, and The Garment District. There are also well known “squares” such as Times Square, Union Square, Lincoln Square and Herald Square and “heights” such as Washington Heights and Morningside Heights. More than any other US city, many of Manhattan’s early neighborhoods were rooted in their ethnic histories such as Little Italy and Chinatown to name a few obvious ones.

Manhattan has a few unique geographic acronyms that are cool to know when you are visiting such as SoHo (SOuth of HOuston Street), NoHo (NOrth of HOuston Street), Tribeca (the TRIangle BElow CAnal Street) and NoLita (NOrth of LIttle ITAly)

And finish with the Bridge and Tunnel crowd:

(often abbreviated B&T or BNT) began as a pejorative term for people who commute into Manhattan from surrounding communities. Controversy exists over whether this term extends to all individuals outside of Manhattan or rather outside the area served by the New York City Subway, a trip that, due to Manhattan’s geography, requires passing over a bridge and/or through a tunnel in a car or commuter train. It can be used to describe residents of the other four New York City boroughs – Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island – but typically refers to those who travel into the city from the Hudson Valley, New Jersey, Connecticut, or Long Island.