Monday Coffee with Woodstock

Woodstock was first seen in the strip in 1967 but was named in 1970 after the summer music festival.

“Woodstock knows that he is very small and inconsequential indeed.
It’s a problem we all have.
The universe boggles us…
Woodstock is a lighthearted expression of that idea.”
~ Charles Schulz

FIRST APPEARANCE:
April 4, 1967
Woodstock is not a great flyer. In fact, he doesn’t even know what type of bird he is. The only thing he knows for sure is that he and Snoopy were destined to be great pals. He refers to Snoopy as his friend of friends, the only one in the neighborhood who understands his chirps. Woodstock is always up for an adventure, but is just as happy relaxing at home.


Personality according to Peanuts

Some say there is nothing to be learned in the comics section of the newspaper.

dievca learned to READ via comic books.

OK, that’s BIG – but other BIG things can be gleaned from reading the comics.

What about Psychology? The BIG 5 personality traits?

Psychological researchers often define personality in terms of five core traits, which can be thought of as stable dispositions that drive behavior. The five-factor model of personality encompasses these basic traits:

The names of these factors convey their meaning. Neuroticism measures an individual’s emotional stability. Extraversion is how outgoing and sociable someone is, whereas Openness to experience conveys someone’s intellectual and experiential curiosity. Conscientiousness taps into one’s discipline, rule-orientation, and integrity. Agreeableness is about being good-natured.

 

Let’s learn about personalities from Peanuts:

Charlie Brown = Neuroticism

Charlie Brown is a model neurotic. He is prone to depression and anxiety and paralyzing fits of over-analysis. Constantly worrying if he is liked or respected, he has a perpetual, usually dormant crush on the little redheaded girl, taking small joys in her foibles that may make her more attainable. He is noted for his inability to fly a kite.

Snoopy = Extraversion

Snoopy is a typical extravert. Flamboyant, daring, and outgoing to a fault, he tries to join in every activity and conversation. He, perhaps, flies gallant missions against the Red Baron and then brags about his exploits. For reasons potentially stemming from his long-ago abandonment of his mother, he aggressively pursues friendship and food. Snoopy is ‘Joe Cool’, the life of the party.

 

Lucy = (Dis)agreeableness

Defined by a single word (crabby), Lucy revels in her disagreeableness. Typical portrayals of Lucy feature her bossing around her friends, dominating her little brother, mocking Charlie Brown’s self-consciousness, and generally being a pain in the neck. Her attempts at psychiatry generally involve misguided advice delivered loudly and angrily. One recurring interaction is Lucy pretending to hold a football out for Charlie Brown to kick, and then pulling it out at the last minute. Brown goes thump and Lucy preens.

Linus = Openness to experience

Linus is clearly the brightest of all of the Peanuts gang. Witty and knowledgeable, he is prone to passionate monologues. He has invented his own creation, the Great Pumpkin, and faithfully waits in the pumpkin patches for him every Halloween. Linus has his own idiosyncrasy, an ever-present blue security blanket — but he does not seem particularly sensitive about it. It’s who he is. Too young to actively try new things, he must instead use his intellect to mull over new and interesting ideas.

Schroeder = Conscientiousness

Charlie Brown, Linus, Snoopy, and even Lucy are fairly well-developed characters. Schroeder is equally lovable, but most casual readers know him for one thing: his piano playing. Yes, Lucy has a crush on him, but that’s about her — he will have none of it. He is always practicing. Disciplined and focused on his passion for classical music, one can imagine him setting his alarm clock for 7 a.m. on weekends to try Autumn Sonata one more time. His one other preferred activity is playing catcher for the baseball team — again, the sturdy, reliable director of the action on the field. Schroeder would offer to help you move and show up 10 minutes early.

 

A ‘Thank You’ to James C. Kaufman and Psychology Today


Chasing Clouds (elderly parents)

Yesterday morning, dievca listened to her brother tell about how her parents both fell and stayed down until the morning, when the CNA arrived.

Where was the evening person?

They quit because dievca’s Dad was such a pain-in-the-a**.

Her brother was working on it and dievca had the talk with her Father, the day before about if they were paying someone 100K, he could demand people to do things exactly his way. Since we are not paying that, he has to be patient and tolerant or no one would stay…

dievca knew something was going to happen, it was expected. and her Dad only learns through drastic lessons. Apparently, he is still insistent that he and Mom need minimal help. Yeah, right.

OK, dievca is flying through the clouds to go research options: assisted living, home care, 24/7 caregivers. set up meetings for assessments, etc. And, of course, hang out with her Parents…..if she doesn’t kill them, 1st.

Wish her luck.

As she was buying tickets for the flight and rental car, dievca found herself looking out the window at the clouds and drifting off in her mind:

“Aren’t the clouds beautiful? They look like big balls of cotton… I could just lie here all day, and watch them drift by… If you use your imagination, you can see lots of things in the cloud formations…

What do you think you see, Linus?”

“Well, those clouds up there look like the map of the British Honduras on the Caribbean…
That cloud up there looks a little like the profile of Thomas Eakins, the famous painter and sculptor… And that group of clouds over there gives me the impression of the stoning of Stephen…
I can see the apostle Paul standing there to one side..

“Uh huh… That’s very good… What do you see in the clouds, Charlie Brown?”

“Well, I was going to say I saw a ducky and a horsie, but I changed my mind!”

― Charles M. Schulz, The Complete Peanuts, Vol. 5: 1959-1960

And then dievca ran into these items from Lacoste and they made her smile through the tears:

I’ve looked at clouds from both sides now
From up and down, and still somehow
It’s cloud illusions I recall
I really don’t know clouds at all

I’ve looked at life from both sides now
From up and down and still somehow
It’s life’s illusions I recall
I really don’t know life at all

― Joni Mitchell, Both Sides Now (pieces) © 1967 Gandalf Publishing Co.


Lacoste, Peanuts & Scoop NYC, for Master? Nah~

Not quite Master’s thing,
but it did make dievca smile.

Lacoste Peanuts Men's Shirts Scoop NYC