There’s name for it = Realistic Optimist

Glass water

Master and His dievca were sharing sushi on the rooftop when dievca mention that she figured out where she fits with her personal outlook (philosophy). she always thought she was just a “realist”, but realized she isn’t very cynical. Then she ran into this tidbit:

This Personality Type Is Linked to Success and Happiness
By Tia Ghose published August 23, 2013

Are you a “glass-half-full” or a “glass-half-empty” kind of person?

As it turns out, some people can be both. So-called realistic optimists combine the positive outlook of optimists with the clear-eyed perspective of pessimists, new research has found.

These realistic optimists may get the best of both worlds, using their realism to perform better at work and elsewhere, but aren’t getting bogged down by unhappiness, said Sophia Chou, an organizational psychology researcher at National Taiwan University, who presented her findings at a meeting of the American Psychological Association in Honolulu, Hawaii. [7 Things That Will Make You Happy]

Past research has shown that optimists value thoughts that make them feel good about themselves, whereas pessimists prize a more truthful vision of themselves. But a clear-eyed view can be bad for pessimists’ well-being, as they tend to be more prone to depression, Chou said.

Optimists tend to live longer and be healthier overall.

After several years working in business, Chou noticed there were some people who were both optimistic and realistic, and that they tended to be very successful. She wondered whether realism and optimism were really diametrically opposed.

So Chou administered a battery of personality surveys to about 200 college and graduate students in Taiwan. The surveys tested how many “positive illusions” the students held, as well as whether they were more motivated by self-enhancement or reality.

Realistic views

The optimists were sorted into two camps: the realists and the idealists.

“Realistic optimists tend to choose accuracy over self-enhancement; the unrealistic optimists tend to choose self-enhancement,” Chou said.

Interestingly, the realistic optimists also got better grades, on average, than their less grounded peers — probably because they didn’t delude themselves into thinking they would do well without studying or working hard, Chou said.

Traditionally, a more realistic outlook is paired with poorer well-being and greater depression, yet the realistic optimists managed to be happy. To understand why, she dug deeper into the personality assessments.

Self-control key

She found that realistic optimists believed they had more self-control and control over their interpersonal relationships.

“Every time they face an issue or a challenge or a problem, they won’t say ‘I have no choice and this is the only thing I can do.’ They will be creative, they will have a plan A, plan B and plan C,” Chou said.

That allows them to stay cheery and upbeat about the future, even if they recognize the challenges of the present.

Being a realistic optimist does have one downside, however: They are more prone to anxiety than their completely unrealistic peers. That’s likely because they recognize the possibility of failure, whereas their counterparts use positive illusions to ease their anxiety, Chou said.

The findings suggest that realistic and unrealistic optimists may actually be very different personality types, Chou said.

In order to cultivate a rosy-but-realistic outlook, people should maintain a clear-eyed view of reality, but emphasize what they can control in most situations, she said.

dievca’s Master has a different take on Himself:
“Idealistic Realism”
An idealistic realist is a realist who understands the realms of possibility but also sees his idealism as a potential reality. You work towards an Ideal knowing the Realities.

By the way – the question of the glass-half-full/empty always baffled dievca – perhaps it is her “realist” tendencies or her Science background – this is her answer:

Glass tech


I can’t…

  
 Photos: dievca NYC 01/2018

Diversity is the Spice of Life: the Hedgehog and the Fox

Biddy the Hedgehog and Friend Zen Moment

Biddy the Hedgehog and Friend Zen Moment @biddythehedgehog

“The Hedgehog and the Fox” is an essay by philosopher Isaiah Berlin. It was one of Berlin’s most popular essays with the public. Berlin himself said of the essay: “I never meant it very seriously. I meant it as a kind of enjoyable intellectual game, but it was taken seriously. Every classification throws light on something.”

Biddy Peek

Biddy peeking out.

Master is the “Hedgehog” and dievca is the “Fox” — they come at information from completely different angles and befuddle each other sometimes with how they think.  Most of the time the differences are humorous — other times downright irritating.  Communication mishaps ensue~

But when all’s said and done — Diversity is the Spice of Life.
If Master and dievca were the same Life would be boring…

———————————————————————————————————————————————

There is a line among the fragments of the Greek poet Archilochus which says:
‘The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.’

Scholars have differed about the correct interpretation of these dark words, which may mean no more than that the fox, for all his cunning, is defeated by the hedgehog’s one defence.

But, taken figuratively, the words can be made to yield a sense in which they mark one of the deepest differences which divide writers and thinkers, and, it may be, human beings in general. For there exists a great chasm between those, on one side, who relate everything to a single central vision, one system, less or more coherent or articulate, in terms of which they understand, think and feel – a single, universal, organising principle in terms of which alone all that they are and say has significance – and, on the other side, those who pursue many ends, often unrelated and even contradictory, connected, if at all, only in some de facto way, for some psychological or physiological cause, related to no moral or aesthetic principle.

These last lead lives, perform acts and entertain ideas that are centrifugal rather than centripetal; their thought is scattered or diffused, moving on many levels, seizing upon the essence of avast variety of experiences and objects for what they are in themselves, without, consciously or unconsciously, seeking to fit them into, or exclude them from, any one unchanging, all-embracing, sometimes self-contradictory and incomplete, at times fanatical,
unitary inner vision.

The first kind of intellectual and artistic personality belongs to the hedgehogs, the second to the foxes;  without insisting on a rigid classification, we may, without too much fear of contradiction, say that, in this sense, Dante belongs to the first category, Shakespeare to the second; Plato, Lucretius, Pascal, Hegel, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Ibsen, Proust are, in varying
degrees, hedgehogs; Herodotus, Aristotle, Montaigne, Erasmus, Molière, Goethe, Pushkin, Balzac, Joyce are foxes.

Full Essay: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s9981.pdf


Now is all you have…

alan-watts-present-moment

Stop and take stock.
Do you like what you have?
Are you who you want to be?

You can plan to be someone else.
Will you commit to those changes?
Or push them off indefinitely?

I like who I am.
Do I need to change?
Will it make you happy?

No.
Forget that.
We need to be happy with ourselves to offer happiness to others.

Now is all I have.
I offer me.
As I am.

Photo: Unknown-Alan Watts quote.