Eye Candy

eye can·dy
/ī ˈkandē
noun – informal
Something purely aesthetically pleasing, that is, pleasing to the senses. Can be a person, a film, a sunset, a flower, or anything else you can see.

~ Urban Dictionary

In a sentence:

dievca is heading to the gym to work on becoming a piece of eye candy for her Master.


Confirmed

Master confirmed what the Accidental Masturbator kindly suggested:

I suspect your arse adds significantly
to his view of the city too.

City View, David Drebin Photography

As he proceeded to take dievca from behind
looking out at the City

and at her ass.


Anywhere you want it~

Doggy Style Graphic

KATIE BUCKLEITNER (Cosmo Sex Positions, click photo)

The kitchen table,
the bed,
the sofa,
the countertop,
the bathroom sink,
the buffet,
the hallway bench,
the lounge chair,
the desk,
the stool,
etc.
An ‘anywhere you want it’ versatile position for your Sir or Mistress.

dievca’s favorite? Looking out on to the City through floor to ceiling windows.
Master has a hint of the exhibitionist in Him.


couchante

Like a lioness couchante,
sated, yet stimulated
awaiting Master

“Female Nude Lying Down” Sanguine and white chalk on cream-colored paper Eric Bossik
click the graphic for the website


What’s better than a cappuccino in the Morning?

Sharing with a Friend.

(Or making one for your Master or Mistress.)

Photos: dievca NYC Chelsea Market 10/2018

Can you see the difference?

They were at the end. dievca was using duct tape to keep the insides from tearing more. she had them for 4+ years, wore them, loved them and was still making excuses about how they looked ok on the outside.

she ripped her heart out and could only give them to Goodwill.  she couldn’t bear to put them in the trash.

Why?

she didn’t think that Cougar made them anymore and they were her favorite.
dievca was wrong.

They do make them ~ $200.00

And they are $70 less at Yoox.

Here’s the question:
Blackout or Classic Pillow?


philosophizing about PRACTICE and myelination on a Monday.

Science has shown us that the brain is incredibly plastic–meaning it does not “harden” at age 25 and stay solid for the rest of our lives. While certain things, especially language, are more easily learned by children than adults, we have plenty of evidence that even older adults can see real transformations in their neurocircuitry.

In order to do any kind of task, we have to activate various portions of our brain. In the context of various tasks including language learning, experiencing happiness, and exercising…our brains coordinate a complex set of actions involving motor function, visual and audio processing, verbal language skills, and more. At first, the new skill might feel stiff and awkward. But as we practice, it gets smoother and feels more natural and comfortable. What practice is actually doing is helping the brain optimize for this set of coordinated activities, through a process called myelination.

Scientists have found that myelination increases the speed and strength of the nerve impulses by forcing the electrical charge to jump across the myelin sheath to the next open spot on the axon. In other words, myelin turns the electrical signal into the brain version of Willy Wonka’s sideways traveling elevator. Instead of traveling in a straight line down the axon, the charge is hop-skip-jumping down at a much faster rate.

Practice Makes Myelin, So Practice Carefully

Understanding the role of myelin means not only understanding why the amount of practice is important to improving your skill (as it takes repetition of the same nerve impulses again and again to activate the two glial cells that myelinate axons), but also the quality of practice. Similar to how the science of creativity speaks about idle time and not crushing through one task after the other, practicing with a focus on quality is equally important.

As an Athlete, my coach put a spin on the old phrase and would always say: “Practicing poorly just develops poor skills.” If we practice poorly and don’t correct our mistakes, we will myelinate those axons, increasing the speed and strength of those poor signals. Not good.

Practicing skills over time causes those neural pathways to work better in unison via myelination. To improve your performance, you need to practice often, and get feedback so you practice correctly.

Whew! A bit heavy on a Monday…but where dievca’s mind is dwelling~

Photo: dievca NYC 01/2017
Thank you to Buffer and Lifehacker, Jason Shen