Sticky and Wet

20210702_131229With the humidity in NYC,
one cannot escape sweating.
dievca arrived at Master’s wet and sticky.
All was solved with soap, water and shower sex.
Something to be taken carefully,
but worth the effort to beat the heat.
XO

photo: dievca - shower accoutrements 07/2021

Hot Kitty…

Cat and Fan

dievca is melting in the heat. she’s going to break down and turn the AC on.  It’s really hot humid….


Lick a block of ice – Beat the Heat

Children lick a massive block of ice to stay cool on a hot day. July 6, 1912.
Library of Congress; Ryan Stennes

What do you do when you don’t have AC?

We got through the July Heatwave, but temperatures and humidity in NYC are still running high:

  • Tuesday – Still steamy with a high of 90.
  • Wednesday – Thunderstorm or two with a high of 88.
  • Thursday – Heavy storms with peeks of sun. High 84.
  • Friday – Still a chance for a storm with a high of 82.
  • Saturday – Humid blend with a high of 81.
  • Sunday- A chance for a shower or thunderstorm. High 81.
  • Monday – Hot and humid. High 90.

The humidity is enough to warrant using the AC. But parts of NYC don’t have electrical service and that wasn’t an option in July 1911. All along the East Coast of the United States, temperatures climbed into the 90s and stayed there for days and days, killing 211 people in New York alone.

Though temperatures never quite broke 100 degrees in the first two weeks of July in New York, the city was poorly equipped to handle the heat and the humidity that went with it. Poor ventilation and cramped living spaces exacerbated the problem, ultimately leading to the deaths of old and young alike, with children as small as two weeks old becoming overcome by the heat.

In the peaks of the wave, people abandoned their apartments for the cool grass of New York’s public spaces, napping beneath trees in Central Park or seeking shade in Battery Park.

The streets were anarchic: People reportedly ran mad in the heat (one drunken fool, described by the New York Tribune as “partly crazed by the heat,” attacked a policeman with a meat cleaver), while horses collapsed and were left to rot by the side of the road.

Around July 7, when temperatures returned to ordinary levels of July sweat, the humidity remained high. It was this, reported the New York Times, that was responsible for so many of the casualties, “catching its victims in an exhausted state and killing all of them within the hours between 7 and 10 a.m.” The New York Tribune phrased it still more dramatically: “The monstrous devil that had pressed New York under his burning thumb for five days could not go without one last curse, and when the temperature dropped called humidity to its aid.”

City authorities did what they could to handle the heat, including flushing fire hydrants to cool off streets. At the end of the first week, even a terrific thunderstorm did little to alleviate the discomfort. In New York, the Times reported, it was simply a few showers “accompanied by much thunder, which rumbled as early as 5:45 a.m., giving promise of big things, and then disappeared into the ocean.”

A second thunderstorm, around the 13th, finally brought temperatures back down to manageable levels. As it did so, however, five more people died from lightning strikes.

Original information by Natasha Frost, modified by dievca


Keepin’ it cool~


How are you battling the heat?


So Hot, You’re Cool – a recipe

 

It’s called the TRPV1 receptor. So when you eat or drink something hot, these receptors get that heat signal, and that tells the nerve to let the brain know what’s going on. When the brain gets the message “It’s hot in here,” it turns on the mechanism we have to cool ourselves off: sweating.

dievca has exchanged recipes with friends and family during the COVID-19 quarantine and this is a recipe she tried and enjoyed: Cajun Shrimp Pasta
Warning – dievca didn’t have any Cajun Spice mix so she made the offering from the same blog (recipe below)
It’s got a serious kick.

And her cooling system works efficiently. Hello, sweaty upper lip!
Maybe this is something for Temperature Play?!?!?

 

Photo: dievca Cajun Shrimp Pasta

CAJUN SHRIMP PASTA

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 6 servings
Calories: 429 kcal
Author: Krissy Allori – recipe found on the Self Proclaimed Foodie Blog

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 8 ounces penne pasta
  • 1 pound raw shrimp deveined, cleaned, tail removed
  • 2 tablespoons cajun seasoning *see note below
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup parmesan cheese

Instructions

  • Add salt to a pot of water and bring to a boil. Cook pasta to al dente doneness. Before draining, scoop out at least 1/2 cup of the cooking water. Drain pasta and set aside.
  • While the pasta is cooking, cook the shrimp and sauce. Combine shrimp with cajun seasoning and olive oil in a bowl. Toss to combine.
  • Heat large skillet over medium-high heat. Add butter and melt. Add shrimp in a single layer and cook until golden brown on each side, turning only once. You may have to cook shrimp in two batches to allow enough room. Once done cooking, transfer cooked shrimp to a clean plate and reduce heat to medium-low.
  • Add heavy cream to pan and scrape bottoms to release any food that is stuck to the bottom. Allow the cream to bubble. Reduce heat to low and stir in parmesan cheese to melt. Add cooked pasta and shrimp and stir to coat. If the sauce needs to be thinned, add pasta water, one tablespoon at a time until desired consistency is achieved.

Photo: dievca Cajun Spices 06/2020

Cajun Spices (if needed)

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 teaspoons onion salt
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Instructions

  • Combine all spices in a small bowl. Use as a dry rub on poultry, beef, shrimp, etc. You can also add to sauces and soups. Store in an airtight container.

Notes

Makes 1/4 cup
Equal portions of onion powder and kosher salt can be used in place of onion salt


Time to commune with nature.

Hilda and the Frog: Duane Bryers

Air Conditioning can be so artificial.
Time to squeeze into that bikini and be with the natural elements.
You may be hot, but your soul will feel better facing the Sun.

 


How to beat the heat in NYC – old school

Mayor Hylan turning on the water for the first shower, July 6, 1921. West 47th Street near 8th Avenue, New York City. Photo by International Newsreel.

Enjoying the Croton Surf Under the Fire Department Sprinkler on 85th Street Near Lexington Avenue, August 17, 1920. Fire Department erects sprinkler for kiddies at 85th Street & Lexington Avenue, NYC. Kids enjoy bathing during hot weather. Photo by International Newsreel.

Kids in New York City splash around in a street flooded by fire hydrants, circa 1957. Keystone/Getty Images

Play Street and street shower alongside the Queensboro Bridge, June 22, 1934. Department of Bridges, Plant & Structures Collection, NYC Municipal Archives.

Denis P. Gorman Memorial Playground, Jackson Heights, Queens: Opening ceremonies, children grabbing for melon, August 11, 1934. Department of Parks & Recreation Collection, NYC Municipal Archives.

Kids in Harlem, New York City, cool off in front of a fire hydrant, circa 1966. Harry Benson Getty Images

dievca is ready to run under a fire hydrant sprinkle shower if the FDNY would oblige…


And then something brings absolute Sparkle to your day~

Like everyone, dievca has her worries.  They add up to create fatigue. Then there is evidence that one of the worries is bucking the trend and involved with something you know brings them shear Joy. dievca started crying when her Mom’s caregivers sent photos of something beautiful:

Mom looks like the Goddess she is…


Summer Sensation Play

dievca had not been in a 7-Eleven store for 17+ years.
One Slurpee and now she sees them everywhere!

The heat and humidity caused her to step into that 7-Eleven on Broadway…
Choosing the traditional Coke flavor and knowing it contained yucca extract to give her Slurpee an airy consistency – dievca found her Summertime Bliss.

dievca and Master have been talking about Sensation Play,
a Slurpee might be a good addition for dripping and licking.
Hmmm. Summer Sensation!

Machines to make frozen beverages were invented by Omar Knedlik in the late 1950s. The idea for a slushed ice drink came when Knedlik’s soda fountain broke down, forcing him to put his sodas in a freezer to stay cool, which caused them to become slushy. The result was popular with customers, which gave him the idea to make a machine to help make a “slushy” from carbonated beverages. When it became popular, Knedlik hired artist Ruth E. Taylor to create a name and logo for his invention. She created the ICEE name and designed the original logo, which is used today. Early prototypes for the machine made use of an automobile air conditioning unit.

After a successful trial of ICEE machines in 100 stores, 7-Eleven in 1965 made a licensing deal with The ICEE Company to sell the product under certain conditions. Two of these were that 7-Eleven must use a different name for the product and that the company was allowed to sell the product only in 7-Eleven locations in the US, a non-compete clause ensuring the two drinks never went head to head for distribution rights. 7-Eleven then sold the product that in 1966 became known as the “Slurpee” (for the sound made when drinking them). The term was coined by Bob Stanford, a 7-Eleven ad agency director.

Slurpee Photos dievca 07/2019

Hot Times via Weegee

As for Coney Island on weekends, block after block of beach was so jammed with people that it was barely possible to find a space to sit or to put down your book or your hot dog.

As dievca changed her calendar, she stared at the WeeGee Coney Island Photo – amazed and appalled. Too hot, too many people. This after she was lying sprawled on the sofa eating chilled watermelon in the City’s heat and humidity. Now, in the bedroom, the AC is turned on.

People on West 110th Street, where I lived, were a little too bourgeois to sit out on their fire escapes, but around the corner on 111th and farther uptown mattresses were put out as night fell, and whole families lay on those iron balconies in their underwear.

Even through the nights, the pall of heat never broke. With a couple of other kids, I would go across 110th to the Park and walk among the hundreds of people, singles and families, who slept on the grass, next to their big alarm clocks, which set up a mild cacophony of the seconds passing, one clock’s ticks syncopating with another’s. Babies cried in the darkness, men’s deep voices murmured, and a woman let out an occasional high laugh beside the lake. I can recall only white people spread out on the grass; Harlem began above 116th Street then.

(The New Yorker“Before Air-Conditioning” by Arthur Miller, June 22, 1998, p. 144)

Weegee was the pseudonym of Arthur Fellig, a photographer and photojournalist, known for his stark black and white street photography.

A "Thank You" to Aphelis.net and 

Melting – and not in a good way.

dievca had the brilliant idea of riding her bike to 60 Centre Street to reschedule her Jury Duty.
she thought it would save time and avoid sweltering in the subway.

Reviews of the subway:

“It’s like a wet sauna,” said Todd Ronin, 36, as he waited for the R train, “like a dirty wet sauna with all the germs and the lovely things you find here.”

Paul Pope, 40, an electrician lugging about 40 pounds of equipment with him. The sensation, he said, was not pleasant. “Do I look too pleasant? Look at me, I am drenched right now. I am so drenched.”

“If it’s humid, that’s the worst part, ’cause New York turns into a swamp,” said Diego Medina, 33, who was heading home toward Ditmas Park. “There’s something about the humidity in the city and the crowding, I think, just gets people, makes people a little more crazy.”

That bike ride?
A Bad Idea.
dievca was completely drenched with sweat, too.
Her dress, her underwear, her hair – everything was…..soaked.


Then she ran back to work and froze in the Air Condition because she was completely wet.

That brought to mind the 2005 NY Times Article about Luxury Retail vs. Low End Retail Air Condition temperatures. The findings were, the more exclusive and expensive the store, the lower the temperatures (click here for the article)

After melting, things did get better. dievca decided since she came home wet, she would just go up to the rooftop to soak up some sun. It was really windy up on the roof and that dried dievca’s dress quickly. Lying in a bikini for 45 min warmed up her fatty tissue (boobs and ass).

Pasta and kale salad for dinner.

Then dievca topped the evening off with a silly Pinot Grigio (the bottle made her smile) and a Good Humor Ice Cream sandwich (childhood memories)
Inspired!

Stay cool!


Stay cool!


Sweltering in NYC and other places- hope you are staying cool!

Photo: Pirelli Calendar

How’s the weather?

M.
Starfished nude on the bed.
No covers and just a fan moving the air.
Wafting it past my moist skin, causing my nipples to pucker.
It’s hot in the City.
d.


…beat the heat…

popsicle lick tasty tuesdays

Negligence never tasted so good, thanks to Frank Epperson. In 1905, the eleven-year-old boy left a cup filled with soda powder, water, and a stirring stick on his porch in San Francisco. Temperatures dropped overnight, the mixture froze, and Frank was left with an accidentally icy treat: the popsicle. The rest is history.

Popsicle Story

And where can Master put that popsicle?
Anywhere Master desires.