There’s name for it = Realistic Optimist

Glass water

Master and His dievca were sharing sushi on the rooftop when dievca mention that she figured out where she fits with her personal outlook (philosophy). she always thought she was just a “realist”, but realized she isn’t very cynical. Then she ran into this tidbit:

This Personality Type Is Linked to Success and Happiness
By Tia Ghose published August 23, 2013

Are you a “glass-half-full” or a “glass-half-empty” kind of person?

As it turns out, some people can be both. So-called realistic optimists combine the positive outlook of optimists with the clear-eyed perspective of pessimists, new research has found.

These realistic optimists may get the best of both worlds, using their realism to perform better at work and elsewhere, but aren’t getting bogged down by unhappiness, said Sophia Chou, an organizational psychology researcher at National Taiwan University, who presented her findings at a meeting of the American Psychological Association in Honolulu, Hawaii. [7 Things That Will Make You Happy]

Past research has shown that optimists value thoughts that make them feel good about themselves, whereas pessimists prize a more truthful vision of themselves. But a clear-eyed view can be bad for pessimists’ well-being, as they tend to be more prone to depression, Chou said.

Optimists tend to live longer and be healthier overall.

After several years working in business, Chou noticed there were some people who were both optimistic and realistic, and that they tended to be very successful. She wondered whether realism and optimism were really diametrically opposed.

So Chou administered a battery of personality surveys to about 200 college and graduate students in Taiwan. The surveys tested how many “positive illusions” the students held, as well as whether they were more motivated by self-enhancement or reality.

Realistic views

The optimists were sorted into two camps: the realists and the idealists.

“Realistic optimists tend to choose accuracy over self-enhancement; the unrealistic optimists tend to choose self-enhancement,” Chou said.

Interestingly, the realistic optimists also got better grades, on average, than their less grounded peers — probably because they didn’t delude themselves into thinking they would do well without studying or working hard, Chou said.

Traditionally, a more realistic outlook is paired with poorer well-being and greater depression, yet the realistic optimists managed to be happy. To understand why, she dug deeper into the personality assessments.

Self-control key

She found that realistic optimists believed they had more self-control and control over their interpersonal relationships.

“Every time they face an issue or a challenge or a problem, they won’t say ‘I have no choice and this is the only thing I can do.’ They will be creative, they will have a plan A, plan B and plan C,” Chou said.

That allows them to stay cheery and upbeat about the future, even if they recognize the challenges of the present.

Being a realistic optimist does have one downside, however: They are more prone to anxiety than their completely unrealistic peers. That’s likely because they recognize the possibility of failure, whereas their counterparts use positive illusions to ease their anxiety, Chou said.

The findings suggest that realistic and unrealistic optimists may actually be very different personality types, Chou said.

In order to cultivate a rosy-but-realistic outlook, people should maintain a clear-eyed view of reality, but emphasize what they can control in most situations, she said.

dievca’s Master has a different take on Himself:
“Idealistic Realism”
An idealistic realist is a realist who understands the realms of possibility but also sees his idealism as a potential reality. You work towards an Ideal knowing the Realities.

By the way – the question of the glass-half-full/empty always baffled dievca – perhaps it is her “realist” tendencies or her Science background – this is her answer:

Glass tech


Words

Language is a measure of culture, but also, in many ways, language can be a measure of time. The words we use—if they are new or relatively new—are the words we need to express and explain our world. If these words then also become widely used, it becomes the dictionary’s job to explain this use.

Here are some words that were added to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary this year:

  • Long hauler : a person who experiences one or more long-term effects following initial improvement or recovery from a serious illness (such as COVID-19)
  • Pod and Bubble : a usually small group of people (such as family members, friends, coworkers, or classmates) who regularly interact closely with one another but with few or no others in order to minimize exposure and reduce the transmission of infection during an outbreak of a contagious disease. Bubble also gained an additional meaning: an area within which sports teams stay isolated from the general public during a series of scheduled games so as to prevent exposure to disease and that includes accommodations, amenities, and the location at which the games are held
  • Hard pass : a firm refusal or rejection of something (such as an offer)
  • Flex informal : an act of bragging or showing off
  • Cancel culture : the practice or tendency of engaging in mass canceling as a way of expressing disapproval and exerting social pressure
  • Makerspace : a communal public workshop in which makers can work on small personal projects
  • Coworking : being, relating to, or working in a building where multiple tenants (such as entrepreneurs, start-ups, or nonprofits) rent working space (such as desks or offices) and have the use of communal facilities
  • Crowdfunding : the practice of obtaining needed funding (as for a new business) by soliciting contributions from a large number of people especially from the online community
  • Gig worker : a person who works temporary jobs typically in the service sector as an independent contractor or freelancer
  • Decarceration : release from imprisonment also : the practice or policy of reducing the number of people subject to imprisonment
  • BIPOC (abbreviation) : Black, Indigenous, (and) People of Color
  • Folx : folks —used especially to explicitly signal the inclusion of groups commonly marginalized
  • Sapiosexual : of, relating to, or characterized by sexual or romantic attraction to highly intelligent people
  • Silver fox : an attractive middle-aged man having mostly gray or white hair
  • ASMR or autonomous sensory meridian response : a pleasant tingling sensation that originates on the back of the scalp and often spreads to the neck and upper spine, that occurs in some people in response to a stimulus (such as a particular kind of sound or movement), and that tends to have a calming effect
  • Hygge : a cozy quality that makes a person feel content and comfortable
  • Second Gentleman : the husband or male partner of a vice president or second in command of a country or jurisdiction