licentious LYNX – travel made……cozy

Master has to do a three-day “quickie” to the West Coast and back. she knows that His time on the ground is going to be stressful, so here’s hoping His flights are quite remarkable.

Lynx, the male grooming brand sold by Unilever, is sold on the basis of sex appeal. Lynx is the UK, Ireland, Australia and NZ version of Unilever’s ‘male grooming’ product Axe. 

In 2005, the Australian television viewers were being introduced by a new ‘sex appeal’ stunt: the launch of a fictitious airline. Seven airline hostesses walk towards us on the tarmac, each wearing yellow sunglasses. The voice over: “Imagine a level of comfort never experienced before in air travel”. We move to a shot of a sky bed, big enough for the a hostess to snuggle up to the sleeping male passenger. “With in-flight entertainment (Spanking, Hula Hoop and Pillow Fighting) that is second to none”.

On June 21, 2006, on the Grand Prix and Gold awards won by Lynx Jet at Cannes. LynxJet, Demo (instructions for removing a bra) and Blanket (a mostess solution to cold male passengers) won Bronze Lions in the Film section.

Despite the mixed reception from the wider Australian public, the target audience, young single men between the ages of 18 and 25, bought into the concept. Sales of Lynx Body Spray grew by 20 percent in four weeks to take an 84.2 percent share of the Australian market.

Note:

Unilever arranged to have one of Jetstar’s planes painted in the yellow colors of the Lynx campaign. Hostesses on the designated flights between Victoria and Queensland were not expected to dress or behave like the ‘mostesses’ in the Lynx TV ads. All the same, Jetstar thought again and withdrew from the deal. The plane went back to normal colors in the light of complaints from airline stewards, Jetstar marketing consultants and the public.

Advertising Credits

Lowe Hunt.
Team included Adam Lance, Dejan Rasic, Simone Brandse, Howard Collinge, Michael Canning and Darren Bailey.

Filming: Nicholas Reynolds via Plaza Films
Producer, Cathy Rechichi
Director of photography, Daniel Ardilley
Editing, The Tait Gallery by Danny Tait.

Music, composed by Kevin Kehoe
Sound Design, Paul Taylor at Sound Reservoir.
Post production, design and special effects, Postmodern Sydney.
Photography, Stephen Stewart

dievca just had to laugh and say, “Know your target audience”, apparently they did.


Where to have Coffee on a Weekend in NYC (and a History lesson)

1996 Map of Governors Island

Governors Island

In 1996 the Military Era ended. In 2003, it was transferred to the City and State of NY for $1.00 with 22 acres earmarked for the National Park Service. 2014 arrived with Phase I development completed with 30 acres opened to the public. 2016 opened up, “The Hills” – rising 70 feet above the harbor with spectacular views. The future plans will include completing the “Master Plan” when funds become available and offering spaces to tenants to develop the Historic District, plus other development zones.

2018 Map of Governors Island

dievca’s friend rode the Island when it first opened  to the public and it was desolate.   FDNY used some of the military base housing for fire training and its a strange thing to see the burned out houses…The development of the Island has been slow, yet well-done.  Hammocks for lounging, fountains to run through, excellent food trucks, a well-known Jazz Festival, easy biking, a lookout hill, glamping, etc.

The evenings are lovely and the mornings are spectacular for the silence. Silence in the City.

A Brief History of Governors Island

An island at the tip of Lower Manhattan provided a stage where a local military community participated in national and international events. From its military beginnings as a colonial militia in 1755, Governors Island became a major headquarters for the U.S. Army and Coast Guard, making it one of the longest continually operated military installations in the country until its closure in 1996. Military decisions made throughout the island’s history reverberated through communities and neighborhoods across vast oceans. Although no longer a military post, Governors Island remains in public service, maintaining a watchful eye on the future and poised to redefine itself for the changing expectations of an ever-changing community.

Initially, Governors Island was valued more for its environmental attributes than its strategic position. The island’s natural resources and location within the diverse ecosystem of New York Harbor became a foundation upon which four nations were attracted, many hoping to fulfill their dreams of economic security. The Lenape and Dutch Nations took advantage of the harbor and its trade opportunities as well as the island’s plant and animal life. The British valued the area’s strategic potential, and by 1674, secured the region for themselves. Recognizing the island’s pastoral qualities, it was set aside for “’the benefit and accommodation of his Majestie’s Governors’” and from then on would be known as Governors Island. By 1776, tensions between England and her American colonies peaked. General Washington and his colonial army made a valiant yet unsuccessful attempt to secure New York against a siege by the British during the first and largest battle of the Revolution, The Battle of Brooklyn. Although the British captured and occupied New York for the duration of the war, the memory of these events steeled the resolve of the young nation to protect its borders against foreign occupation.

The end of the Revolution marked the beginning of a new nation, and a new banner under which Governors Island would serve. With international politics threatening domestic security and overseas trade, the United States developed a defensive strategy to protect its coastal borders and its most prolific ports. Despite initial fears of a large central government and standing army, federal funds were provided to build fortifications around important harbors. Known as the federal system of coastal defense, these systems of forts were staffed by quick responding local militia. The coastal initiative marked one of the first decisions made by the young government to unite behind a plan to protect the interests of her new nation. In New York, federal funds were supplemented by state contributions and later, by the city’s residents who volunteered to help construct the new forts.

Fort Jay and Castle Williams on Governors Island were two of the largest coastal fortifications in the Harbor. In 1794, Fort Jay was erected atop the remains of the earthworks used during the Revolution, and was refurbished in 1808. By 1811, Colonel Jonathan Williams designed a prototypical circular fortification which became known as Castle Williams. Williams, the first American born military engineer, planned the elaborate system of forts that were strategically placed throughout the harbor. With the outbreak of the War of 1812, these installations, along with others in the harbor, proved to be powerful deterrents to the British Navy who blockaded the harbor instead of entering it. New York’s coastal defenses underscored the importance that a unified system of fortifications could ensure the safety and livelihood of a community and ultimately, a nation.

Although the island’s fortifications became defensively obsolete by the 1830s, Governors Island remained in military service, while other harbor island installations were converted to non-military uses. The island became an administrative and training center for a peacetime U.S. Army and it served as a mustering point for personnel during the Mexican and Civil Wars. It also served as a federal arsenal, and an army music school. It was during the Civil War that Castle Williams’ use changed from a coastal fortification to a prison first for Confederate prisoners of war, and later as a military stockade for the U.S. Army. By 1878, Governors Island evolved from a small military outpost to the army headquarters for the Military Division of the Atlantic and Department of the East, responsible for coordinating army activities for the eastern United States. Once Governors Island became a headquarters, officers were able to bring their families to live on the island. The National Historic Landmark District is dotted with community structures which include a movie theatre, YMCA, Officer’s Club, public school and three religious chapels, a quiet neighborhood not far from the hustle and bustle of New York City life.

As New York City gained international importance, so did the prestige of a posting on Governors Island. For senior officers, it was recognition of accomplishment and a test of leadership that often led to more senior commands and responsibilities at the highest levels of the army. Additionally, soldiers stationed here enjoyed social, political and commercial connections in the city rivaled by few other army posts. Newspapers of the day heralded the arrival of a new headquarters commander and the society pages would report on sporting and aviation events and occasionally announce the wedding of a captain or a major to a bride well-known to New York society.

The army headquarters became nationally recognized as it played a greater role in international affairs through two World Wars. By World War II, the island was the headquarters of the U.S. First Army. Originally established in Europe in 1919, First Army initiated early planning efforts for the D-Day invasion in 1944 and led the American landing in Normandy, which resulted in the liberation of Europe.

In November 1964, the army announced that it would close its remaining New York posts and left Governors Island on June 30, 1966. Known as Changeover Day, this date marked the end of one military presence and the beginning of another. Governors Island “re-enlisted” with the U.S. Coast Guard becoming the largest Coast Guard base in the world and headquarters for its Atlantic Area command. The Coast Guardsmen and their families enjoyed the same sense of community and military prestige as their predecessors, a blend of small town life at the heart of one of America’s largest cities.

After 30 additional years of service, the Coast Guard announced that they too would leave Governors Island ending the island’s two-century military career. The closure was a quiet admission that island fortresses and urban military garrisons, although critical in the past, were no longer of primary importance in defending against the nation’s modern threats. As one of the last New York bastions of coastal defensive history drew to a close in 1996, Governors Island has again been called to serve. The island has returned to a civilian use, and will be developed as a public venue for exploration and discovery. Today, trees and an array of old brick buildings soften the profile of Governors Island. Fort Jay and Castle Williams along with the military community that evolved around them provided the safety and security from 1794 to 1996 which allowed New York City to develop and evolve into this nation’s center of commerce and finance. Governors Island chronicles the history of groups of people united behind their commitment to the national community they called home.

Thank you to http://www.nps.gov


It’s Friday, something to get the party started…


and finished quick!
Keep those Tums (Rolaids, Antacids) available.

dievca knows about Milwaukee’s Beast from $2.00 pitchers in College.
The next mornings were really rough.


All mixed up~


dievca is all turned around. Her parents do that to her – it all blends. she hasn’t missed her dental appointment or dinner with friends, but it came close. You have seen this in the blog….she did Lingerie on Wednesday. (yesterday) instead of Thursday. Click “yesterday” if you missed it.

Now dievca knows why her Mother is always asking her what day it is….no papers coming, dievca doesn’t watch TV and hasn’t been on the computer too much because there is weeding, sorting, gardening, cleaning, trips to the store, family visits and trying to include her Dad and Mom as much as possible (slow going). All is a blur.

We will see if she makes it to her flight – tomorrow? or maybe the day after. Argh! she better look.
Is dementia catchy? dievca feels short-term memory loss is just one of the signs of old age. she IS getting older in Libra.


It still starts with Coffee: Happy Labor Day

Good Morning!


Good News! The Home Aide broke dievca’s parents coffee maker which ground coffee beans. It was an older Melitta Mill & Brew Coffee Maker and it took a Master’s degree to work it when you didn’t do it everyday. A pain-in-the-neck to clean.
dievca bought her Parent’s a Keurig K55/K-Classic Coffee Maker from Amazon. They make one cup of coffee for dievca’s Mother, per day. It also means that dievca can get a decent cup of coffee without using her Graduate degrees.
And that is one way to celebrate Labor Day — Use less Labor.

(On hand, 8 O’Clock Original Coffee from Maryland, started in 1859. It’s a solid basic coffee.)

PS. Those people from the Czech Republic did come over and it made dievca’s Dad really happy.
Coffee, Tea and Kringle.

In the United States, kringles are hand-rolled from Danish pastry dough (wienerbrød dough) that has been rested overnight before shaping, filling, and baking. Many sheets of the flaky dough are layered, then shaped into an oval. After filling with fruit, nut, or other flavor combinations, the pastry is baked and iced.

Racine, Wisconsin has historically been a center of Danish-American culture and kringle making. A typical Racine–made kringle is a large flat oval measuring approximately 14 inches by 10 inches and weighing about 1.5 pounds. The kringle became the official state pastry of Wisconsin on June 30, 2013.

Wikipedia


How’s your weekend flowin’?


Dreaming back to a gentle moment in NYC because…
after getting off the plane in the Midwest, I was off to the races!

  • Urgent Care immediately upon arrival for Mom (non-emergency, something that needs to be watched)
  • Feeding Tube Prep, Meds grinding/dilution (My brother needed a weekend off)
  • Heard some stories 4 times already (no clue he told me = short-term memory wipe. Told well)
  • Apparently my Father imposed on some Friends who have relatives in from the Czech Republic, he insisted on them bringing them over. Ages 10-17 with their Mother, ummm, at 9 am. Yeah, Dad gets up at 9.
  • No food to offer them, 10 pm grocery run.
  • Music band playing until midnight across the lake, an accordion involved.
  • Serious Thunder Boomers at 2 am, spectacular, loud, scary and a tree went down in the yard.
  • Having coffee before we are off to the races!

Hope your weekend is rolling along in a gentle way. My 18 hours is…rockin’!


So, you were wondering what LSD is?

No, not the drug. This:

Wiki Commons

  • It’s a very comforting feeling to drive a road you love. It’s also called the “Outer Drive”. I forgot that the song was used in Guardians of the Galaxy 2.
  • It’s a very comforting feeling to listen to Chicago accents and think about my brothers graduating High School in the 70’s. And, yeah, there were drugs. Even if you were phenomenal athletes like they were ~ heck, maybe it helped.

I missed out. My age being many moons after them. That’s not a bad thing.

Here’s the story of the song from the manager and the last surviving member of the band who wrote the song, Skip Haynes. He died last year. Cancer. I always wonder about those DDT trucks, cruising neighborhoods killing mosquitoes. Do you wonder?