une pyramide merveilleuse

Friends, does he remember when we left Avranches? 
A beautiful setting sun shone in the branches; 
Our wheel, by the way, crumpled the green bushes; 
We all looked at the fields, the heavens, the seas…

” Le Mont Saint-Michel apparaît (…) comme une chose sublime, une pyramide merveilleuse.”
Victor Hugo, 1865

And the start of the 2016 Tour de France…

Photos: dievca France 08/2018

France is run on Food.

The French: they talk food, they seek food, they cherish food, they live food.

dievca knew that.
It became more clear throughout the week while driving all over Normandy. Many restaurants are/were closed for the August Holidays and finding food became a challenge. Dealing with a “foodie” increased the stress.  It meant that running to a supermarché became imperative.

After a really bad meal at a desperate Chinese restaurant stop,
dievca was all for having food on hand.

That said, dievca and her friend ran into some great food, too.  A Senegalese chicken and rice joint on the edge of the Seine River run by a very elegant and social Lady. A new Japanese Restaurant in the University section of Lille started by a young Chinese girl with her Mom helping.  A local restaurant recommended by the Lady of a chambre d’hotes off  the beaten path, yet, 10 minutes away from the Le Mont-Saint-Michel walk.

And dievca cannot forget the various pâtisserie and salon de thé.

This post was brought to mind when dievca’s friend went into full-blown conversation about the differences between food from Normandy vs. Brittany at the breakfast table for 30 minutes one morning. The stereotypes are there for a reason:
France = Food.

Photos: dievca 08/2018 France

Thanking the Danish when your feet are beat~

dievca walked a lot in Normandy and Brittany….hiking the cliffs, walking cities, walking to and around Le Mont Saint Michel, D-Day beaches, etc. She didn’t bring hiking shoes because of work and because she thought she would be in Paris.  Her tennis shoes did well, but she lost her flip-flops and her feet needed a break.

Her recent purchase of the  ILSE JACOBSEN Tulip Shoes ended up being fabulous. dievca had been unsure of the buy, but they completely gave her feet that much-needed break.  The soles flexes and gives a soft landing. Great for after a long day of hiking.

Click here for Amazon’s Ilse Jacobsen’s items. (Danish lifestyle brand ILSE JACOBSEN. HORNBÆK)


A little italiàno travels well

So, dievca has been at a caffeine loss since Scandinavia.  The French coffee is not as strong.
dievca was forced to seek alternative coffee and espresso filled the bill.
Thank goodness for the Italians!
(and a heck of a lot of them are wandering Normandy and Brittany)


You know if it was NYC…

the sundeck would be jammed.

Not a bad place to take a good beer, right?
Château de Caen – William the Conqueror built the Castle c. 1060

Then dievca spotted this at the supermarché…what?
“Sex in a Canoe” Beer
Looks awful. 
(all the way from outside Dallas, Texas)

Phew~

Photos: dievca 08/2018 Caen, France

Incredibly Lovely!

sub card

ILLUSTRATION: ANJA SLIBAR

But, sometimes you are ready to return to normal.


Storybook

dievca’s view

Pieces of Bayeux

The Bayeux Tapestry; French: Tapisserie de Bayeux [tapisʁi də bajø] or La telle du conquest; Latin: Tapete Baiocense) is an embroidered cloth nearly 70 metres (230 ft) long and 50 centimetres (20 in) tall, which depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England about William, Duke of Normandy, and Harold, Earl of Wessex, later King of England, and culminating in the Battle of Hastings. It is thought to date to the 11th century, within a few years after the battle. It tells the story from the point of view of the conquering Normans.

According to Sylvette Lemagnen, conservator of the tapestry, in her 2005 book La Tapisserie de Bayeux:

The Bayeux tapestry is one of the supreme achievements of the Norman Romanesque …. Its survival almost intact over nine centuries is little short of miraculous … Its exceptional length, the harmony and freshness of its colours, its exquisite workmanship, and the genius of its guiding spirit combine to make it endlessly fascinating.

The designs on the Bayeux Tapestry are embroidered and not woven, so that it is not technically a tapestry.[5] Nevertheless, it has always been referred to as a tapestry until recent years when the name “Bayeux Embroidery” has gained ground among certain art historians. The tapestry may be seen as a perfect example of secular Norman art.

During the Second World War, Bayeux was the first city of the Battle of Normandy to be liberated, and on 16 June 1944 General Charles de Gaulle made the first of two major speeches in Bayeux where he made clear that France sided with the Allies. The buildings in Bayeux were virtually untouched during the Battle of Normandy, the German forces being fully involved in defending Caen from the Allies.

Thank you to wiki and Photos: dievca 08/2018