Found car – will drive (Walt Whitman)


POEM of the ROAD – Walt Whitman (excerpt)

To take to your use out of the compact cities as
you pass through!
To carry buildings and streets with you afterward
wherever you go!
To gather the minds of men out of their brains as
you encounter them! to gather the love out
of their hearts!
To take your own lovers on the road with
you, for all that you leave them behind
you!
To know the universe itself as a road—as many
roads—as roads for traveling souls!

The soul travels,
The body does not travel as much as the soul,
The body has just as great a work as the soul,
and parts away at last for the journeys of the
soul.

All parts away for the progress of souls,
All religion, all solid things, arts, governments —
all that was or is apparent upon this globe or
any globe, falls into niches and corners before
the processions of souls along the grand roads
of the universe,
Of the progress of the souls of men and women
along the grand roads of the universe, all
other progress is the needed emblem and
sustenance.

Full poem HERE

New Yorker Cartoon

dievca found a rental car and is making her way to her Mom. If there’s no hotel – sleeping in the car will do. Food is packed for along the way. Always an interesting first 30 miles when she hasn’t driven in a while – but it will be dievca and the trucks most of the way. Wish her “good luck”! XO


“And your very flesh shall be a great poem.”

The point when you come home and my nose nestles into your neck.  The smell of you tickles my senses and brings me immense Joy.  My eyes close, my shoulders relax and you inhale/exhale deeply into my hair. The tension rolls off. Peace.

The flesh may not be perfect, but the nooks, crannies, and scars read like poetry. The epic piece is called You. And the pleasure derived from the re-reading of the work cannot be measured. It is a treasure of Life, of Us.

The quote from Walt Whitman applies in its short form.
In the long form, one us falls short and it’s not you.
But, the sentiments do offer an altruistic way to live life.

This is what you shall do
“This is what you shall do; Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body.”

“This is what you shall do…” by Walt Whitman,
from the preface of Leaves of Grass.
Public domain.


Time

Time

It is the strangest thing,
dievca has never experienced this with anyone else.

With Master,
time disappears.

It doesn’t matter what Master and dievca are doing:
making dinner, cleaning house, relaxing, playing, working, taking a shower, whatever.
Either Master or dievca will glance at a clock
and time has flown on.

It is beautiful.

No boredom.

No counting the hours.

It is dangerous.

Losing a schedule.

Then, thrown out of the mists in a jarring manner.

The desire to stay and lose time is an aphrodisiac.
But, it is not always possible to indulge.

So, dievca will treasure the loss of time with Her Master.

 

The quote above is a paraphrase, but I love the sentiment.

Here is the poem from which it was gleaned and it’s original meaning:

Once I Pass’d Through a Populous City
by Walt Whitman

Once I pass’d through a populous city imprinting my brain for future
use with its shows, architecture, customs, traditions,
Yet now of all that city I remember only a woman I casually met
there who detain’d me for love of me,
Day by day and night by night we were together—all else has long
been forgotten by me,
I remember I say only that woman who passionately clung to me,
Again we wander, we love, we separate again,
Again she holds me by the hand, I must not go,
I see her close beside me with silent lips sad and tremulous.